10 Movie Quotes You Always Wanted To Say In Combat

Humor
Screenshot taken from "Gladiator."
Courtesy of YouTube.

Your primary weapon is down, and you only have one magazine left for your pistol. You’re outnumbered, outgunned, and separated from your unit. The enemy is closing in, and you know you’re not going to make it out of this one.


You light up your last smoke, make your peace with whatever higher power you believe in, and step out to meet your fate, and as you do, you say something badass.

We’ve all thought about this. In the messed up recesses of our minds, we’ve all wondered how that scene might go down: the last stand, and the epic one-liner. And as you round the corner, cigarette hanging from your lower lip, you finally get the chance to say it:

“Do you feel lucky, punk? Well, do ya?”

Now, we all know that never happens in real life — it’s a glorified Hollywood facade that sells violence and death like sex, and makes light of the human costs of war.

Related: 20 Lame One-Liners Overused In War Movies »

But, we can’t deny it, we all have that tiny little voice that wonders, “How cool would it be to say something like that?” So, in honor of the juvenile daydreams we’ve each had at least once in our lives, here are 10 movie quotes you’ve always wanted to say in combat.

1. 300: “Tonight, we dine in hell!”

2. Apocalypse Now: “I love the smell of napalm in the morning.”

3. The Matrix: “Dodge this.”

4. Aliens: “Game over, man, game over!”

5. Independence Day: “Welcome to earth.”

6. Die Hard: “Yippee-ki-yay, motherfucker.”

7. Gladiator: “At my signal, unleash hell.”

8. Scarface: “Say hello to my little friend.”

9. Sudden Impact: “Go ahead, make my day.”

10. Predator: “I ain’t got time to bleed.”

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