11 Marines Booted From The Corps In The Wake Of The 'Marines United' Scandal — So Far

news
Photo via DoD

This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.


The Marine Corps continues to wade through prosecutions of active-duty troops found to have been involved in the swapping of nude photos of troops through the "Marines United" Facebook page last year, or other social media misconduct in a similar vein.

As of this month, 101 prosecutions have been completed, with 11 troops sent to court-martial, Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Glenn Walters said Tuesday. Walters, who was made head of initiatives to investigate the social media scandal and root out underlying cultural issues, told members of the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services that, in all, the Marine Corps had identified 185 persons of interest suspected of social media misconduct, including 163 Marines and 22 civilians.

Of the 101 dispositions complete as of Sept. 5, the results were as follows:

  • 3 general courts-martial
  • 6 special courts-martial
  • 2 summary courts-martial
  • 16 non-judicial punishments
  • 8 administrative separations
  • 29 adverse administrative actions
  • 37 cases concluded without formal adverse action

All of the courts-martial resulted in bad-conduct discharges, with defendants busted down to private and forced to forfeit all pay and benefits, Walters said.

For the larger number of Marines who received administrative adverse action, Walters said they likely still will see their careers ended over their actions.

"They got a 6105 [adverse counseling] in their record, which means if you're a sergeant or below, you're probably not going to have the cutting score required [to be promoted]," he said. "You know how tight the promotion boards are."

It remains unclear exactly how many active-duty Marines shared or viewed the drive passed around the Marines United Facebook group containing nude photos of troops, some of them identified and shared without the subjects' consent. Some 50,000 users were reportedly members in the group, which was shut down before criminal investigators could act.

Walters said Tuesday that Naval Criminal Investigative Service officials had analyzed 131,000 images across 168 social media platforms, using face-recognition technology to identify victims where possible and take legal action.

Related: The Rise And Fall (And Rise) Of ‘Marines United’ »

While the relatively small number of prosecutions in the year-and-a-half since the existence of Marines United was made public has drawn criticism, Walters highlighted a number of other new policies implemented since the scandal that emphasize the requirement to behave respectfully and professionally on social media.

These include a class on social media offered to all Marine recruits during boot camp; a contract new Marine accessions must sign acknowledging that they're aware of service social media standards and expectations; and new policies requiring mandatory reporting of social media misconduct.

Walters said one recent trend in reporting misconduct is giving him cause for hope.

"What I'm encouraged by is that some of the reports are being generated not by the female Marines, but by male Marines who are seeing another Marine doing something wrong," he said. "It's not a significant number. It's probably in the 8 percent range. But that's 8 percent that we didn't have. So I'm very happy with that."

This article originally appeared on Military.com

Read more from Military.com:

WATCH NEXT:

Casperassets.rbl.ms

Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

Take $75 off a Casper Mattress and $150 off a Wave Mattress with code TASKANDPURPOSE

And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

Read More Show Less

Sometimes, even the most well-meaning of tweets can come back to haunt you as a meme.

Read More Show Less
An AH-64D Longbow Apache helicopter lands during a combined arms demonstration as part of South Carolina National Guard Air & Ground Expo 2009 at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, S.C., Oct. 10, 2009. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Roberto Di Giovine)

Welcome to Confessions Of, an occaisional series where Task & Purpose's James Clark solicits hilarious, embarrassing, and revealing stories from troops and vets about their job, billet, or a tour overseas. Are you in an interesting assignment and think you might have something to share? Email james@taskandpurpose.com with your story.

"Nothing is more powerful than a young boy's wish. Except an Apache helicopter. An Apache helicopter has machine guns and missiles. It is an unbelievably impressive complement of weaponry, an absolute death machine."

While this Patrick Stewart quote may be from an R-rated movie about a talking teddy bear, it's remarkably accurate. After all, the old warhorse has been kicking ass since it was first adopted by the U.S. Army in the 1980s. Designed to get into trouble fast and put it down even faster, the AH-64 Apache usually comes bristling with ordnance, from an M230 chain gun firing 30mm rounds to Hellfire missiles and rockets.

In the words of Tyler Merritt "it's basically a fucking flying tank."

Read More Show Less
James Jackson, right, confers with his lawyer during a hearing in criminal court, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, in New York. Jackson, a white supremacist, pled guilty Wednesday to killing a black man with a sword as part of a racist plot that prosecutors described as a hate crime. He faces life in prison when he is sentenced on Feb. 13. (Associated Press/Bebeto Matthews)

White supremacist James Jackson – accused of trying to start a race war by killing a homeless black man in Times Square with a sword — pleaded guilty Wednesday to murder as an act of terrorism.

Read More Show Less
A soldier plugs his ears during a live fire mission at Yakima Training Center. Photo: Capt. Leslie Reed/U.S. Army

A Texas veteran is suing the company he says knowingly produced and sold defective earplugs which were issued to the U.S. military, leading him and many others to develop hearing problems, including tinnitus.

Read More Show Less