How To Write A Resume That Will Get A Hiring Managers’ Attention

career

So you’re leaving the military and applying to civilian jobs. You’ve had an interesting and fulfilling career and are struggling to “translate” your work into succinct bullets that will show hiring managers you’re a great candidate for the job. The first thing to remember that the purpose of the resume is not to get you a job; it is to demonstrate the experience that makes you a viable candidate in the civilian world and worthy of a job interview. In order to write a clear and concise resume, there are three tips to focus on:


1. Identify the qualities that the ideal candidate would have.

Once you know what types of jobs you’re applying to, think about what the company needs in order to fill their job posting. If the company needs a project manager, ask yourself what an ideal project manager should be like: organized, able to lead teams with varying work streams, good under pressure, etc. If you don’t know what these skills are, research job descriptions for various project manager roles. What are the core qualifications? Once you know what the company is looking for, then consider your own experiences and how they qualify you for a project manager position.

Related: 6 mistakes you might not realize you’re making at work »

2. Tailor your resume bullets to show that you have the right qualifications.

Writing your resume is about showcasing the aspects of your work experience that relate to the job posting you’re applying for. For example, if you’re applying to be a project manager, you’d have a different resume than if you were applying to be salesperson. Don’t fall into the trap of listing everything you’ve ever done in the military. And don’t think that one resume will fit all job listings. Vets have undertaken a lot of different tasks, and much of that experience may not apply to the specific role you’re targeting. While crafting your resume, cite specific accomplishments to demonstrate that you already have the qualities the role requires.

3. Don’t assume that no one will understand your military background.

Yes, you were in the military. Yes, less than 1% of the U.S. population has served in the military. No, it doesn’t mean that you need a military skills translator to write a resume. Companies are looking for great talent, and hiring managers will understand your military experience if you know how to explain your work. If the role you are applying for requires leadership skills, don’t just say that you were a “squad leader with years of leadership experience in combat.” Instead, show that you regularly monitored and reported your team’s activities, that you checked the quality of your team members’ work, and that you’ve led in changing environments. That’s more useful for both you and the hiring manager.

It’s an exciting time to be a transitioning veteran. Companies value your service, and they’re looking for great military talent. Take the time to research the skills required for the job you’re applying to. If you can explain how your skills are a good fit for that role, the hiring managers will understand.

Photo by Tech. Sgt. Brian Christiansen

NAVAL BASE SAN DIEGO — An enlisted Navy SEAL sniper testified on Wednesday that Chief Eddie Gallagher told his platoon prior to their deployment that if they ever captured a wounded fighter, their medics knew "what to do to nurse them to death."

In early morning testimony, former Special Operator 1st Class Dylan Dille told a packed courtroom that he had heard the phrase during unit training before the men of SEAL Team 7 Alpha Platoon deployed to Mosul, Iraq in 2017.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army photo)

A Navy SEAL sentenced to one year in prison for the death of Army Special Forces Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar is under investigation for allegedly flirting with Melgar's widow while using a false name and trying to persuade her that he and another SEAL accused of killing her husband were "really good guys," according to the Washington Post.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army/Capt. Jason Welch)

Soldiers with the 3rd Cavalry Regiment from Fort Hood, Texas, returned from a deployment to Iraq, Syria, and Kuwait, in February 60 combat badges richer.

Read More Show Less
Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Andrew Porch/U.S. Army

Army Staff Sgt. Albert Leon Mampre, who served during World War II with the famed Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division depicted in the HBO series 'Band of Brothers,' was laid to rest on June 15th, the Army announced

Mampre, who died on May 31 at 97 years old, was the last living medic from Easy Company, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. A number of soldiers assigned to his unit provided an honor guard for his funeral service.

Read More Show Less

In his seven months as legislative assistant to the commandant of the Marine Corps, Brig. Gen. Norman Cooling proved to be an abusive, bullying boss, who openly disparaged women, ruled through intimidation, and attempted to spread a rumor about a female officer after the Senate complained about him to the defense secretary, according to a Defense Department's Inspector General's Office investigation.

"The adjectives a majority of witnesses used to describe his leadership were abusive, bullying, toxic, abrasive, and aggressive,"a DoD IG report on the investigation into Cooling's conduct found. "Some subordinates considered him an 'equal opportunity offender,' disparaging men and women. BGen Cooling denied making some of the comments attributed to him, but more than one witness told us they heard him make each of the comments described in this section of our report."

Read More Show Less