The 4 Most Dangerous Countries, According To Army Chief Of Staff

news

Earlier this year, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley ranked four nations as the most dangerous to U.S. national security: Russia, China, Iran, and North Korea.


Though there was no definitive ranking of these nations, he stressed that Russia is number one, according to Breaking Defense.

Russia

It is the only country that is “literally an existential threat,” Milley said at an Association of the U.S. Army breakfast, adding that Russia can physically destroy us. In addition, the country has postured itself as an aggressive state over that last several years.

In a January interview with Task & Purpose, Rebecca Zimmerman, an associate policy analyst with RAND Corporation, said that what Russian President Vladimir Putin is doing is referred to as “measures short of war,” operating in a way that stops short of requiring U.S. military response, but not by much.

Milley cited the country’s response to Crimea, the attack on Georgia, and the increase in defense spending on modernization efforts as posturing. He also suggested that Russia is invading sovereign nations in a way that has not been seen since 1945.

Related: 8 emerging threats the Defense department will face in 2016 »

China

Milley suggested that while Russia is aggressive, China is “assertive.”

While its Navy has begun exploring disputed waters, the country has made no attempts to venture into other sovereign nations. In addition, the China is not our enemy … yet.

“I would caution anyone from saying China is an ‘adversary,’” he said.

The issue is the long-term potential. Its economic growth and increasing military power suggest a steady rise, and may indicate a major power shift, which could be dangerous in the future.

Iran

Though Iran seems to be compliant with the terms of the 2015 nuclear deal, the nation still remains a question in the minds of the security community. The Wall Street Journal recently reported that old uranium particles found at a base in Iran suggest President Hassan Rouhani was lying when he said that there were no plans to acquire nuclear weapons.

Though he did not dwell on the topic, Milley said, “There’s no doubt Iran is a malign actor.”

North Korea

Yes, everyone knows it has a small military, petulant leader, and is a resource-depleted country. But North Korea does have nuclear capabilities. All four characteristics make for an unstable nation with very little to lose. Plus, North Korea is backed by China in most instances.

Though the threats of nuclear destruction have all proven to be empty words said by paper tigers, that doesn’t mean they always will be.

According to Milley, “just because it didn’t happen before is not a guarantee it won’t happen tomorrow.”

DoD photo
Photo: Sgt. Raquel Villalona/U.S. Army
U.S. troops rejoice — the midnight curfew for service members in South Korea has been temporarily suspended, as command evaluates if you can be trusted to not act like wild animals in the streets of Pyeongtaek.

Giphy

Read More Show Less

Late last month Activision's Infinity Ward dropped a teaser trailer for Call of Duty: Modern Warfare — a soft-reboot of one of it's most beloved games — and just two weeks after the May 30 reveal, the game developer unveiled some new details on what's in store for the first-person shooter's multiplayer: Juggernaut and ghillie suits!

Read More Show Less
Members of the Iranian revolutionary guard march during a parade to commemorate the anniversary of the Iran-Iraq war (1980-88), in Tehran September 22, 2011. (Reuters photo)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Iran says it will exceed limits on its enriched uranium stockpiles agreed in its 2015 nuclear deal, the latest escalation in tensions after the US accused Iran of sabotaging oil tankers last week.

Under the 2015 deal — formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) — Iran agreed with the Obama administration and several European states to limit uranium production.

Read More Show Less
REUTERS/Ahmed Kingimi

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - At least 30 people have been killed in a triple suicide attack in northeast Nigerian state of Borno, state emergency officials said on Monday, in the biggest mass killing this year by suicide bombers.

No group has yet claimed responsibility for the attack.

Read More Show Less
(AP Photo/South Bend Tribune, Greg Swiercz)

Your humble Pentagon correspondent has never been one of the "cool kids" in the world of Washington media, and never has that been more evident than in my failed attempts to interview Navy veteran Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and one of the roughly 50,000 Democrats running for president.

To the media, Buttigieg is so hot right now that he could melt the stealth coating off an F-35 – which is actually not as hard as it sounds. He is fluent in more forms of communication than C-3PO – in April, he offered his condolences to the French people for the Notre Dame fire in perfect French. He's had no problem getting media coverage from all sorts of media outlets, including National Public Radio, the New York Times, or even Fox News.

Your intrepid Pentagon correspondent was briefly on Mayor Pete's schedule, when his director of campaign operations Max Harris set up an interview for Feb. 26. But less than an hour later, Harris emailed back to say he might have to reschedule the interview due to scheduling conflicts.

Four months of silence followed. (To be fair, his campaign manager Lis Smith did confirm in March that Buttigieg had formed an exploratory committee to run for president.)

Read More Show Less