4 Nanodegree Programs That Will Help You Land A Job Without Going To College

Education
U.S. Air Force photo by Photo via Senior Airman Brett Clashman

The landscape of education and professional development is rapidly changing. A well-rounded four-year education is no longer the only sure-fire method for charting a path toward career success. Employers want to hire talented people who are ready to contribute from day one, or they won’t even bother opening the door for consideration.


Nowadays, industry credentials and hyper-focused vertical skills, like project management or product development, are in high demand. For millennials seeking a career in web-design and data-based careers, a compact, narrowly targeted training program is ideal. This type of condensed technical education and training is known as a nanodegree, a concept pioneered by the online college Udacity. A nanodegree is a certification that can be acquired in less than 12 months, at a pace of 10 to 20 hours of effort on a weekly basis. Earning a nanodegree can be an alternative way to breaking into a well-paying data or web-design-based career.

The two huge advantages of nanodegrees are that they’re much less costly than traditional degrees, and they’re also much less time consuming, with some programs taking as few as eight weeks to complete. A glaring disadvantage is the lack of balance with other important educational pieces that you might find in a liberal arts concentration. For those looking to break into the tech industry, a nanodegree provides a fast track to earnings by tailoring your education to what you need to be successful in your technical career.

Here are four nanodegree programs that have major upsides in the job market:

1. Full-stack web developer

A good friend of mine from the Air Force is now a well-paid civilian, with a pretty cool job at an innovative technology company. I have a college degree, and he does not. Yet, we both earn comparable salaries. That’s possible because he earned a nanodegree in full-stack web development, a track that familiarizes programmers with each layer of software technology. A full-stack web developer does front-end and back-end coding and also gets involved in product development. This program teaches skills specifically in HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby on Rails, Node.js for APIs, and other market-critical coding languages.

The program my buddy attended was just 12 weeks long, but he received an official job offer before he was even finished. He is truly a coding enthusiast, and now he earns a living doing it full time.

2. Data analyst

Back in 2013, CNBC recognized data analyst as the sexiest job of the 21st century. That’s why this nanodegree can open up a lucrative pathway. According to Udacity, this program prepares candidates to classify unlabeled data; make future predictions through applied statistics and machine learning algorithms; extract, transform, and load varying data; and more. In addition, learning to create data visualizations for the purpose of effectively communicating data analysis is a vital component of this program. If this nanodegree interests you, then expect around $60,000 or more as an average annual salary.

3. User interface and experience design

The user-experience design process requires keen attention to detail and sharp technical acumen. A school like General Assembly offers this nanodegree with an emphasis on interaction and interface design, prototyping and testing, and collaboration with teams and clients. General Assembly’s program is 10 weeks long. According to Glassdoor, the national average salary for a person who obtains this skillset is $90,000 per year.

4. Product management

In 10 weeks you could earn a product management nanodegree. With our “apps gone wild” society, where we’re also pushing everything into “the cloud,” becoming a product manager should transform you into a very busy sought-after professional. You can become an expert at technical and agile project management, user-centered design, and developing minimum viable products, which can be something you sell before building, like delivering a mobile application with minimal code inputs.

Even if you’re already equipped with a college degree, pursuing a nanodegree may still prove highly beneficial. Consider your options, and to do more independent research. Maybe it will catapult your career to new heights, or at least bump up your earning power a bit.

New London — Retired four-star general John Kelly said that as President Donald Trump's chief of staff, he pushed back against the proposal to deploy U.S. troops to the southern border, arguing at the time that active-duty U.S. military personnel typically don't deploy or operate domestically.

"We don't like it," Kelly said in remarks at the Coast Guard Academy on Thursday night. "We see that as someone else's job meaning law enforcement."

Read More Show Less
Photo: Iran

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Yemen's Houthi rebel group, part of a regional network of militants backed by Iran, claims to be behind the drone strikes on two Saudi oil facilities that have the potential to disrupt global oil supplies.

A report from the United Nations Security Council published in January suggests that Houthi forces have obtained more powerful drone weaponry than what was previously available to them, and that the newer drones have the capability to travel greater distances and inflict more harm.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Air Force has selected two companies to make an extreme cold-weather boot for pilots as part of a long-term effort to better protect aviators from frostbite in emergencies.

In August the service awarded a contract worth up to $4.75 million to be split between Propel LLC and the Belleville Boot Company for boots designed keep pilots' feet warm in temperatures as low as -20 Fahrenheit without the bulk of existing extreme cold weather boots, according to Debra McLean, acquisition program manager for Clothing & Textiles Domain at Air Force Life Cycle Management Command's Agile Combat Support/Human Systems Division.

Read More Show Less

DUBAI (Reuters) - Iran rejected accusations by the United States that it was behind attacks on Saudi oil plants that risk disrupting world energy supplies and warned on Sunday that U.S. bases and aircraft carriers in the region were in range of its missiles.

Yemen's Houthi group claimed responsibility for Saturday's attacks that knocked out more than half of Saudi oil output or more than 5% of global supply, but U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the assault was the work of Iran, a Houthi ally.

Read More Show Less
Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

Nearly a decade after he allegedly murdered an unarmed Afghan civilian during a 2010 deployment, the case of Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn is finally going to trial.

Read More Show Less