These 5 Companies Want Vets With IT Expertise

career
Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Tracy J. Smith

There’s a high demand for professionals who know their way around technology equipment, computers, programming languages, technical project management, and data. Because of this, Hirepurpose partner companies in all business sectors — from gaming to manufacturing — are frequently seeking individuals who have spent their time in the military working as software engineers, information security analysts, and network administrators.


Check out these five companies that are hiring vets for these roles now.

Fiserv is a global financial services technology provider with more than 13,000 clients and 22,000 associates worldwide. The company has been named FORTUNE World’s Most Admired Companies for three consecutive years. Veterans looking for an environment where leadership, collaboration, and innovation are valued should consider Fiserv as their next career path. Most client support openings require an associate’s or bachelor’s degree.

See all jobs with Fiserv »

Fannie Mae is a leading source of financing for mortgage lenders, providing access to affordable mortgage financing in all markets at all times. Its financing makes sustainable homeownership and workforce rental housing a reality for millions of Americans. The company is actively looking for cyber security analysts to join its team.

See all jobs with Fannie Mae »

Opportunities for military personnel and their families abound with Comcast NBCUniversal, which currently has more than 2,000 jobs of all kinds available across the United States. In partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s “Hiring Our Heroes” initiative, Comcast NBCUniversal is well on its way toward fulfilling its pledge to hire 10,000 veterans, reserve component service members and military spouses by the end of 2017.
 

TEKsystems, one of the leading recruiters and providers of IT talent to corporations across America, is looking for motivated project managers to join its team. Recognized as a Military-Friendly Employer by Victory Media, TEKsystems has employed over 3,000 veterans since 2014. This company is looking for individuals with excellent communication and technical skills for its systems administrator roles.

See all jobs with TEKsystems »

Cisco is transforming the way people work, live, play and learn. For 17 years, the company has been named a Fortune 100 Best Place to Work, and has been listed among 25 companies as one of the world’s best multinational workplaces. Cisco is currently hiring service members for its project manager opportunities.

See all jobs with Cisco »

A smoking U.S. Army Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle in Poland on January 18, 2020 (Facebook/Orzysz 998)

A U.S. Army Stryker armored vehicle burst into flames on the side of a Polish roadway on Saturday, the Army confirmed on Monday.

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A U.S. Soldier assigned to 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) runs for cover during a live fire exercise at the 7th Army Training Command, Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany. (U.S. Army/Gertrud Zach)

A memo circulating over the weekend warning of a "possible imminent attack" against U.S. soldiers in Germany was investigated by Army officials, who found there to not be a serious threat after all.

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The U.S. Navy will name its fourth Ford-class aircraft carrier after Doris Miller, an iconic World War II sailor recognized for his heroism during the Pearl Harbor attack, according to reports in The Honolulu Star-Advertiser and U.S. Naval Institute News.

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly is expected to announce the naming of CVN-81 during a ceremony on Monday in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, according to USNI. Two of Miller's nieces are expected to be there, according to the Star-Advertiser.

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Comedian and activist Jon Stewart meets with members of Toxic Exposures in the American Military (TEAM), a coalition of veteran and military service organizations, Jan. 17 on Capitol Hill. (Courtesy of TEAM)

Comedian Jon Stewart has joined forces with veterans groups to make sure service members who have been sickened by toxins from burn pits get the medical care they need, according to the Military Officers Association of America.

"Quite frankly, this is not just about burn pits — it's about the way we go to war as a country," Stewart said during his Jan. 17 visit to Washington, D.C. "We always have money to make war. We need to always have money to take care of what happens to people who are selfless enough, patriotic enough, to wage those wars on our behalf."

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A demonstrator stands outside a security zone before a pro-gun rally, Monday, Jan. 20, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Thousands of pro-gun supporters are expected at the rally to oppose gun control legislation like universal background checks that are being pushed by the newly elected Democratic legislature. (Associated Press/Julio Cortez)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Editor's Note: A version of this article originally appeared on the blog of Angry Staff Officer

This morning, the Virginia state capitol in Richmond saw dozens of armed men gathering to demonstrate their support for the Second Amendment of the United States Constitution – the right to bear arms. These men were not merely bearing arms, however; they were fully accoutered in the trappings of what one would call a paramilitary group: helmets, vests, ammunition pouches, camouflage clothing, and other "tactical" necessities, the majority of which are neither tactical nor necessary. Their weapons, too, are bedecked with all sorts of accessories, and are also in the paramilitary lane. Rather than carry rifles or shotguns that one would use for hunting, they instead carry semi-automatic "military grade" weapons, to merely prove that they can.

This is not an uncommon sight in America. Nor has it ever been. Armed groups of angry men have a long and uncomfortable history in the United States. On very rare occasions, these irregulars have done some good against corrupt, power-hungry, and abusive county governments. For the most part, however, they bode no good.

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