These 5 Companies Want Vets With IT Expertise

career
Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Tracy J. Smith

There’s a high demand for professionals who know their way around technology equipment, computers, programming languages, technical project management, and data. Because of this, Hirepurpose partner companies in all business sectors — from gaming to manufacturing — are frequently seeking individuals who have spent their time in the military working as software engineers, information security analysts, and network administrators.


Check out these five companies that are hiring vets for these roles now.

Fiserv is a global financial services technology provider with more than 13,000 clients and 22,000 associates worldwide. The company has been named FORTUNE World’s Most Admired Companies for three consecutive years. Veterans looking for an environment where leadership, collaboration, and innovation are valued should consider Fiserv as their next career path. Most client support openings require an associate’s or bachelor’s degree.

See all jobs with Fiserv »

Fannie Mae is a leading source of financing for mortgage lenders, providing access to affordable mortgage financing in all markets at all times. Its financing makes sustainable homeownership and workforce rental housing a reality for millions of Americans. The company is actively looking for cyber security analysts to join its team.

See all jobs with Fannie Mae »

Opportunities for military personnel and their families abound with Comcast NBCUniversal, which currently has more than 2,000 jobs of all kinds available across the United States. In partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s “Hiring Our Heroes” initiative, Comcast NBCUniversal is well on its way toward fulfilling its pledge to hire 10,000 veterans, reserve component service members and military spouses by the end of 2017.
 

TEKsystems, one of the leading recruiters and providers of IT talent to corporations across America, is looking for motivated project managers to join its team. Recognized as a Military-Friendly Employer by Victory Media, TEKsystems has employed over 3,000 veterans since 2014. This company is looking for individuals with excellent communication and technical skills for its systems administrator roles.

See all jobs with TEKsystems »

Cisco is transforming the way people work, live, play and learn. For 17 years, the company has been named a Fortune 100 Best Place to Work, and has been listed among 25 companies as one of the world’s best multinational workplaces. Cisco is currently hiring service members for its project manager opportunities.

See all jobs with Cisco »

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