5 Energy-Sector Companies Hiring Veterans Now

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U.S. Army photo

Veterans who have been trained to work in energy-related fields will find themselves in high demand in the civilian world. Over the next 10 years, experts are predicting that approximately 62% of the workers in energy may retire or leave their jobs, including 110,000 employees in the most critical roles: line workers, technicians, plant and field operators, and engineers. As with all sectors, energy also requires skilled employees with marketing, administration, and sales expertise.


If you are looking to break into the stable and profitable energy industry, check out these five Hirepurpose partner companies that are hiring veterans right now.

Manufacturing, engineering, sales, and marketing jobs with Schneider Electric

Schneider Electric, a global specialist in energy management and automation, is a great company for veterans to explore for their next career move. With a robust veterans recruiting program, Schneider is known for its attention to detail and dedication to helping employees learn, grow, and thrive. Former service members of all ranks who have expertise in mechanical, industrial or electrical engineering, field services, sales, marketing, supply, or operations will find their skills transferrable to the many positions that Schneider has open across the country right now. For those who are looking to expand their experience and are pursuing a degree, Schneider also has 39 full or part-time internships available focusing on everything from business skills to digital marketing to engineering.

See all jobs with Schneider Electric »

Manufacturing, engineering, sales, and marketing jobs with BP

If you are a military veteran who is looking to get your foot in the door in the oil and gas industry, then BP is a great option. As one of the world’s leading energy companies, BP employs over 80,000 employees in 80 countries. The company has a track record of supporting the military community and has been designated as a military-friendly employer in the energy sector by Victory Media. In fact, of the 30 operators BP hired for its Toledo, Ohio facility, 14 were military veterans. In addition to engineering and energy jobs, BP has openings for individuals who served in occupational specialities in the administration, supply, public relations, or finance fields. Educational requirements vary by position with some administration jobs requiring a minimum of a high school diploma and other specialized business, supply chain management, and engineering positions requiring a bachelor’s degree or higher and significant experience.

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Engineering, electronics, and motor transport roles with Air Products

Air Products is a top manufacturer of industrial gases and chemicals that operates over 200 plants in the North American region. The company has some great opportunities available right now that would be a good match for veterans or their family members with a background in engineering, electronics, mechanics, or motor transport. The company has a 40-year history of hiring transitioning veterans, seeking the leadership and technical skills that former service members have to offer. They also have several post-doctoral internships for chemical and mechanical engineers or applications developers or computer scientists.

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Engineering, nuclear energy, construction, and IT positions with Exelon

The nation's leading competitive energy provider, Exelon, is currently looking for veterans with nuclear, engineering, computer security, and construction expertise to join its team. Exelon has demonstrated a commitment to those who have served through its veterans services and extensive recruiting out of the military community. In fact, over 10% of its current workforce hold a veteran status. Position openings include entry-level jobs and internships, as well as part- and full-time jobs with titles like cyber security engineer, plant manager, regulatory engineer, nuclear equipment operator, property manager, and more.

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Engineering, maintenance, and mechanical jobs with Johnson Controls

Former soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines who spent their military tours focusing on mechanical concepts, maintenance, and engineering tasks will find their skills transferrable to the jobs that Johnson Controls is looking to fill right now. Known for its military-friendly culture, Johnson Controls has pledged to hire veterans as member of the Veterans Jobs Mission coalition. It also has an active veterans resource group and extremely useful online skills translator to help you find the right fit. Most jobs require technical skills and a bachelor’s degree, while some have a lower barrier to entry and place a high value on military experience. It even has a variety of internships that are open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

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