5 Epic Movie Gunfights Where Nobody Ever Reloads

Entertainment
Rambo: First Blood Part II

When it comes to war movies, the fast-paced action blockbusters that have defined American pop culture since the ‘80s have a bad reputation: massive explosions, impossible marksmanship, and nobody ever, ever runs out of ammo. Yes, it’s a hole the genre is finally starting to dig out of with incredible technical expertise on display in more recent Hollywood projects like John Wick  and 13 Hours, or in TV miniseries like History Channel's SIX. But if you want proof that this wasn’t always the case, just look back a few decades to the age of “unlimited ammo.”


Related: 20 Lame One-Liners Overused In War Movies »

Here are five epic shootouts where the heroes simply don’t have time to waste reloading; after all, the bad guys aren’t gonna kill themselves in an infinite hail of gunfire.

Rambo: First Blood Part II

You can’t talk about over the top (but unquestionably awesome) shootouts without mentioning Sylvester Stallone’s muscle-bound, mulleted Vietnam War veteran character. In Rambo: First Blood Part II, our M60-toting hero liberates a group of American Vietnam War prisoners with little more than “the pig” and a two-foot-long belt of 7.62 ammo, but that’s all he needs, because that M60 is magic. No, seriously, watch it: Anytime it gets close to running dry, the belt is back in the next scene, practically unchanged. It doesn’t matter that this beast can fire up to 550 rounds a minute, or that Rambo spends roughly 19 seconds firing (though, in his defense, he’s not firing at the cyclic rate). But even firing at a sustained rate of 100 rounds a minute, he’d certainly have burned through most or all of that ammo belt.

Die Hard 2

After once again shimmying his way through a ventilation shaft — really, John McClane must have an amazing sense of direction given all the times he’s had to navigate a maze of air ducts  — Bruce Willis bursts into a room littered with scaffolding and ladders that must be magnetic. Everyone, good and bad, proceeds to miss for the next minute straight, with the majority of the rounds glancing harmlessly off of random poles or pieces of sheet metal.

Though McClane does reload, he fires off roughly 30 rounds before slamming a fresh mag into his Beretta 92, which only holds 15, all the while the two bad guys spray the area with wildly inaccurate but sustained fire from 30-round Heckler & Koch MP5Ks. Fortunately for McClane, he’s the good guy, which means the villains miss every time — and their firearms jam.

Commando

Reloading is for sissies. That’s why Col. John Matrix (Arnold Schwarzenegger) not only wades into a firefight with the best name for a fictional Delta Force operator ever, but an entire armory’s worth of firepower.

Before Matrix even gets close to expending all his ammunition during the shootout, he jumps from one weapon to the next. Pretty much anytime Matrix disappears from view, he reemerges with a new weapon, but he never, ever reloads. The firefight starts off with a few rounds from an AK before Matrix transitions to an Uzi, punctuated by a seemingly infinite cache of hand grenades. A few more rounds with that tiny little death-dealer, then it’s time for the Desert Eagle, followed by a few slugs with a Remington 870, before wrapping this murderfest up with the M60 — probably the same one from Rambo: First Blood Part II.

The Matrix

If you think super-soldiers pack a lot of guns, how about Keanu Reeve’s hacker super-assassin Neo? There’s actually a relatively reasonable explanation for all the firepower he’s packing: The Matrix is a computer program, and that means cheat codes, baby, infinite fucking inventory and infinite ammo. Then again we wouldn’t know if that’s the case: Neo drops his weapon and grabs a new one every few seconds. Though who really needs a gun when you’ve got Kung Fu — or the ability to stop bullets.

Face/Off

When everyone’s dual-wielding pistols like Wyatt Earp at the O.K. Corral and dropping like flies, what’s the point of reloading? There are plenty of extra guns lying around. That seems to be the modus operandi for Nicholas Cage and John Travolta's face-swapping fury-monsters in this wondrously campy grudge match.

Case in point: In one scene Travolta pulls a Stechkin automatic pistol out of his ass and opens up on Cage for a hot minute, missing every time. The next moment, he gets it knocked out his hand, at which point, Cage grabs it, and fires again for a few more seconds, and misses, too, but who cares? It’s not like that thing only carries 20 rounds. Oh wait: It does.

The first grenade core was accidentally discovered on Nov. 28, 2018, by Virginia Department of Historic Resources staff examining relics recovered from the Betsy, a British ship scuttled during the last major battle of the Revolutionary War. The grenade's iron jacket had dissolved, but its core of black powder remained potent. Within a month or so, more than two dozen were found. (Virginia Department of Historic Resources via The Virginian-Pilot)

In an uh-oh episode of historic proportions, hand grenades from the last major battle of the Revolutionary War recently and repeatedly scrambled bomb squads in Virginia's capital city.

Wait – they had hand grenades in the Revolutionary War? Indeed. Hollow iron balls, filled with black powder, outfitted with a fuse, then lit and thrown.

And more than two dozen have been sitting in cardboard boxes at the Department of Historic Resources, undetected for 30 years.

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(From left to right) Chris Osman, Chris McKinley, Kent Kroeker, and Talon Burton

At least four American veterans were among a group of eight men arrested by police in Haiti earlier this week for driving without license plates and possessing an arsenal of weaponry and tactical gear.

Police in Port-au-Prince arrested five Americans, two Serbians, and one Haitian man at a police checkpoint on Sunday, according to The Miami-Herald. The men told police they were on a "government mission" but did not specify for which government, according to The Herald.

They also told police that "their boss was going to call their boss," implying that someone high in Haiti's government would vouch for them and secure their release, Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles told NPR.

What they were actually doing or who they were potentially working for remains unclear. A State Department spokesperson told Task & Purpose they were aware that Haitian police arrested a "group of individuals, including some U.S. citizens," but declined to answer whether the men were employed by or operating under contract with the U.S. government.

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A Coast Guard lieutenant arrested this week planned to "murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country," according to a court filing requesting he be detained until his trial.

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(Getty Images/Spencer Grant)

(Reuters Health) - Military service members who are at risk for suicide may be less likely to attempt to harm themselves when they receive supportive text messages, a U.S. study suggests.

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Army Sgt. Jeremy Seals died on Oct. 31, 2018, following a protracted battle with stomach cancer. His widow, Cheryl Seals is mounting a lawsuit alleging that military care providers missed her husband's cancer. Task & Purpose photo illustration by Aaron Provost

The widow of a soldier whose stomach cancer was allegedly overlooked by Army doctors for four years is mounting a medical malpractice lawsuit against the military, but due to a decades-old legal rule known as the Feres Doctrine, her case will likely be dismissed before it ever goes to trial.

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