How To Avoid Getting Duped By A Stripper

Family & Relationships
Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Military-related dating scams happen all the time. Whether you’ve been taken advantage of by a handsy strip club employee, or swindled into sending money abroad to save someone from destitution, there is no shortage of creative romance scamming designed to trick service members, or mislead civilians into thinking they’re falling for fake soldiers or sailors. What’s worse is that in the era of online dating and virtual correspondence, it can be difficult to weed out some of the more elaborate romance scams.


Here are five military dating scams and how to avoid them.

Local strippers in base towns

This one seems like a given, but you’d be surprised how easy it is to fall in love with a stripper. But the truth is, she doesn’t actually want to be your girlfriend. She might tell you that, but she doesn’t … unless your name is money.

Internet viruses

If it looks too good to be true, it probably is. We’ve all gotten those emails that come from attractive strangers asking for help in a complicated situation or offering the greatest night of your life. While these used to be overt — written in Comic Sans with loads of spelling errors and exclamation points — dating apps have made them harder to identify. Apps like Tinder also have problems where a fake person may message you often and quickly. They may want you to try a product or click a link to view their profile. Don’t do it. It’s likely a virus, and sometimes it’s called “phishing.”

Dating app scammers

Different from viruses, these are actual people who are trying to scam you. They may warm you up with pleasant conversation at first, but it will eventually turn into a ploy to get something from you. It may come in the form of a request for bank account information, your social security number, or straight money. These people will be cordial, but will never offer their contact information to you, or agree to meet you in person.

Fake military members

On the reverse, civilians should also be on the lookout for people posing as service members. Using various dating apps and services, these scammers will sell you a sob story about needing money or your social security number. If at any point when you date online, and someone brings up money — he or she is probably scamming you. Never send money for any reason to someone you’ve never met before. Perhaps one of the most common is the Nigerian romance scam, wherein a person with a fake identity claims to be a service member or a veteran who wants to whisk you away and marry you after deployment is over. Usually the best way to avoid falling victim to this scam is to watch for fake documents, broken English, and requests for help.

Related: Westerners are using Tinder in Afghanistan »

Mail-order brides

The internet is littered with sites that offer opportunities to marry buxom South American and Eastern European women. Though the notion of a mail-order bride may seem like a thing of the past, a newer form — an email order bride — has emerged with the birth of the world wide web. First off, according to National Organization for Women's Sonia Ossorio in 2011, “The mail-order bride industry is a softer version of human trafficking.” However, service members make for attractive targets because of the expedient citizenship or green card processes. But these marriages aren’t necessarily built to last. While some success stories are reported, many of these marriages end in divorce. We would consider a prenuptial agreement if you really do choose to go this route. But we wouldn’t advise going through with this in any capacity.

An undated image of Hoda Muthana provided by her attorney, Hassan Shibly. (Associated Press)

Attorneys for the Constitutional Law Center for Muslims in America have filed a lawsuit against Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Attorney General William Barr and President Donald Trump asking the court to recognize the citizenship of an Alabama woman who left the U.S. to join ISIS and allow she and her young son to return to the United States.

Read More Show Less
U.S. soldiers surveil the area during a combined joint patrol in Manbij, Syria, November 1, 2018. Picture taken November 1, 2018. (U.S. Army/Zoe Garbarino/Handout via Reuters)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States will leave "a small peacekeeping group" of 200 American troops in Syria for a period of time after a U.S. pullout, the White House said on Thursday, as President Donald Trump pulled back from a complete withdrawal.

Read More Show Less
Construction crews staged material needed for the Santa Teresa Border Wall Replacement project near the Santa Teresa Port of Entry. (U.S. Customs and Border Patrol/Mani Albrecht)

With a legal fight challenge mounting from state governments over the Trump administration's use of a national emergency to construct at the U.S.-Mexico border, the president has kicked his push for the barrier into high gear.

On Wednesday, President Trump tweeted a time-lapse video of wall construction in New Mexico; the next day, he proclaimed that "THE WALL IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION RIGHT NOW"

But there's a big problem: The footage, which was filmed more than five months ago on Sep. 18, 2018, isn't really new wall construction at all, and certainly not part of the ongoing construction of "the wall" that Trump has been haggling with Congress over.

Read More Show Less
(From left to right) Chris Osman, Chris McKinley, Kent Kroeker, and Talon Burton

A group comprised of former U.S. military veterans and security contractors who were detained in Haiti on weapons charges has been brought back to the United States and arrested upon landing, The Miami-Herald reported.

The men — five Americans, two Serbs, and one Haitian — were stopped at a Port-au-Prince police checkpoint on Sunday while riding in two vehicles without license plates, according to police. When questioned, the heavily-armed men allegedly told police they were on a "government mission" before being taken into custody.

Read More Show Less
Army Sgt. Jeremy Seals died on Oct. 31, 2018, following a protracted battle with stomach cancer. His widow, Cheryl Seals is mounting a lawsuit alleging that military care providers missed her husband's cancer. Task & Purpose photo illustration by Aaron Provost

The widow of a soldier whose stomach cancer was allegedly overlooked by Army doctors for four years is mounting a medical malpractice lawsuit against the military, but due to a decades-old legal rule known as the Feres Doctrine, her case will likely be dismissed before it ever goes to trial.

Read More Show Less