Here Are The 5 Safest US States To Live In, Apparently

Lifestyle

Choosing where to live can be hard, but safety should always be a top factor. Every day, we scroll through our news feeds and see news about shootings, car accidents, terrorism, and natural disasters. What if you could live somewhere that would protect you from most of these phenomena?


Wallethub, a financial advisement site, released a ranking June 6 of the 50 states, from the safest to the most dangerous, using 37 different indicators like unemployment, number of law enforcement officials, and health care availability. Spoiler alert: Most of the safest states are in the Northeast.

Source: WalletHub

1. Vermont

Vermont has the highest rate of personal and residential safety among all 50 states. The population is generally well off, with high marks in terms of financial security. Who knew money could buy safety? (Probably everyone, sigh.)

2. Maine

Maine  has the fewest assaults per capita of any state. Not to mention the state is one of the most prepared for an emergency situation. What that situation may be, we’re not sure.

3. Massachusetts

Massachusetts, though notorious for producing bad drivers (sorry, Massholes!), actually has the fewest driving accidents, earning it a spot at No. 3. What’s more, the state population carries one of the U.S.’s highest rates of health insurance, so even if they do get hurt, residents are covered.

4. Minnesota

The only non-Northeastern state to make the top five, Minnesota boasts a high number of adults who have a rainy-day fund, which evidently translates to happier people and less aggression.

5. New Hampshire

New Hampshire  is No. 1 in financial security and has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country. Seriously, it turns out money really can buy safety. It also helps to note that New Hampshire is the Granite State… so it’s tough, like a rock.

“No place is completely immune to danger of any form,” the report reads. “Some areas simply deal with safety issues better than others.”

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