6 Companies Hiring Sales-Minded Veterans Right Now

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Airman's Attic customer shops Army uniforms on May 26, 2016 at shop near PAX terminal area.
U.S. Army photo

Editor’s Note: The following article highlights job listings from Hirepurpose clients that are committed to filling its ranks with talented members of the military community. Learn more here.


Sales is one of those industries that means a lot of things to a lot of people. When you start learning about sales roles, you’ll find that there is a wide spectrum of opportunity.

Hirepurpose works with many employer partners who are involved with a variety of industries. Each of these companies have sales roles at differing levels that meet the needs of veterans and transitioning service members with an interest and ability to sell products to potential consumers or businesses. People with experience that emphasized interaction with the public, negotiation, service delivery, or those who took on special duties such as recruiting or protocol will be definitely want to check out these six companies with sales roles open now.

Airgas is a company of hardworking men and women dedicated to helping its customers succeed. It is the leading U.S. supplier of industrial, medical, and specialty gases, and related products; one of the largest U.S. suppliers of safety products; and a leading U.S. supplier of refrigerants, ammonia products, and process chemicals. Airgas services over 1 million customers, and safely and reliably provide products, services, and expertise to more than 18,000 associates.

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Dell innovates across devices, ecosystem, and services to design solutions specifically for the way people work. The company takes employee morale, professional growth, and community very seriously and reinforces its commitment to these areas with its veterans employee resource groups.

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Takeda, a 230-year-old pharmaceutical company that strives to make people’s lives better every day, actively seeks out former service members through its targeted recruiting programs and offers amazing military transition support through its very own veteran-engagement employee group.

See all jobs with Takeda »

BJ’s Wholesale Club is dedicated to providing its members with high-quality, brand name merchandise at prices that are significantly lower than the prices found at supermarkets, supercenters, department stores, drug stores, and specialty retail stores. The company provides unlimited opportunities for career growth, tremendous earning potential, and colleagues and management that will recognize and reward employee achievements.

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Penske Truck Leasing has operations in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia — and provides supply-chain management and logistics services to leading companies around the world. The company is dedicated to those who have served and has been selected as a Top 100 Military-Friendly Employer by Victory Media Group year after year.

See all jobs with Penske Truck Leasing »

The Home Depot, the world’s largest home improvement specialty retailer, is seeking motivated veteran candidates to fill a variety of its sales roles. Home Depot has been recognized for its support of military members and their families through its commitment to hire 55,000 veterans in five years. Home Depot also offers a military discount on materials, a scholarship program for military spouses, “Welcome Home” events for returning service members, a military appreciation group that provides volunteers for USO events, and support to volunteer projects that facilitate housing improvements for veterans in need.

See all jobs with The Home Depot »

A student, attending the Burlington County Institute of Technology Medford public school, uses Navy Recruiting Command's virtual reality asset, the Nimitz, during the Philadelphia Swarm. A Swarm event is a large-scale recruiting effort run by the nation's top Navy recruiters to saturate a specified market with Navy outreach, information and recruiting assets Dec. 11, 2019 (Navy photo/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Diana Quinlan)

MEDFORD — The Navy does more than drive boats, but recruiters say students won't just learn that from reading a brochure nowadays.

The Nimitz, a virtual reality-filled tractor trailer used by recruiters, made its way to Burlington County Institute of Technology's Medford campus Wednesday, putting teenagers at the wheel of a boat through simulations of missions.

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U.S. Air Force airmen from the 405th Expeditionary Support Squadron work together to clear debris inside the passenger terminal the day after a Taliban-led attack at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Dec. 12, 2019. (U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Brandon Cribelar)

Blasts from Taliban car bombs outside of Bagram Airfield on Wednesday caused extensive damage to the base's passenger terminal, new pictures released by the 45th Expeditionary Wing show.

The pictures, which are part of a photo essay called "Bagram stands fast," were posted on the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service's website on Thursday.

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The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, June 17, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Shortly after seven sailors died aboard USS Fitzgerald when she collided with a merchant ship off Japan in 2017, I wrote that the Fitzgerald's watch team could have been mine. My ship had once had a close call with me on watch, and I had attempted to explain how such a thing could happen. "Operating ships at sea is hard, and dangerous. Stand enough watches, and you'll have close calls," I wrote at the time. "When the Fitzgerald's investigation comes out, I, for one, will likely be forgiving."

The investigations, both public and private, are out, and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently released a report assessing the changes to training implemented since the collisions.

So, am I forgiving? Yes — for some.

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Belgian nurse Augusta Chiwy, left, talks with author and military historian Martin King moments before receiving an award for valor from the U.S. Army, in Brussels, Dec. 12, 2011. (Associated Press/Yves Logghe)

Editor's note: a version of this story first appeared in 2015.

Most people haven't heard of an elderly Belgian-Congolese nurse named Augusta Chiwy. But students of history know that adversity and dread can turn on a dime into freedom and change, and it's often the most humble and little-known individuals who are the drivers of it.

During the very darkest days of the Battle of the Bulge in World War II, Chiwy was such a catalyst, and hundreds of Americans lived because of her. She died quietly on Aug. 23, 2015, at the age of 94 at her home in Brussels, Belgium, and had it not been for the efforts of my friend — British military historian Martin King — the world may never have heard her astonishing story.

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A Ukrainian serviceman watches from his position at the new line of contact in Zolote, Luhansk region, eastern Ukraine Nov. 2, 2019 (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

More than $20 million of the Pentagon aid at the center of the impeachment fight still hasn't reached Ukraine.

The continued delay undermines a key argument against impeachment from President Trump's Republican allies and a new legal memo from the White House Office of Management and Budget.

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