6 Companies With Maintenance Jobs Around The Country

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Lauren Katzenberg

Companies of all shapes and sizes, in a variety of sectors, depend on complicated machinery, electrical and nuclear equipment, housed within expansive facilities to reach their business objectives. When these pieces of equipment or facilities fail, skilled professionals are needed to fix them.


This week, Hirepurpose highlights six military-friendly companies that have openings across the country well-suited for veterans who underwent electrical mechanical or facilities maintenance training while in the service.

Baxter International Inc. provides a broad portfolio of essential medical products. Recognizing the experience and dedication veterans bring to the workplace, Baxter actively recruits military personnel transitioning to the business world. Their range of career opportunities provides a vast array of possibilities for matching veterans with the right role.

See all maintenance jobs with Baxter »

Airgas, the largest U.S. distributor of industrial, medical and specialty gases, is looking for qualified service members to join its team. Known for its military-friendly policies and dedication to military causes such as Operation Homefront, Airgas is a great company for veterans to consider as they move into the private sector.

See all maintenance jobs with Airgas »

Cummins Inc., a global power leader, is a corporation of complementary business units that design, manufacture, distribute, and service engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems. Cummins offers veterans an integrated balance of challenging professional work experience, exposure to global projects and the opportunity to make an immediate impact.

See all maintenance jobs with Cummins »

Eaton provides energy-efficient solutions that help our customers effectively manage electrical, hydraulic and mechanical power more efficiently, safely and sustainably. We value the contributions of the men and women who have served our country and are now making daily contributions to the continued success of our company. Their outstanding leadership skills and ethics have added to our solid foundation for Eaton’s continued growth.

See all maintenance jobs with Eaton »

The Home Depot, the world’s largest home improvement specialty retailer, is seeking motivated veteran candidates to fill their positions. Home Depot has been recognized for its support of military members and their families through its commitment to hire 55,000 veterans in five years. Home Depot also offers a military discount on materials, a scholarship program for military spouses, “Welcome Home” events for returning service-members, a Military Appreciation Group that provides volunteers for USO events, and support to volunteer projects that facilitate housing improvements for veterans in need.

See all maintenance jobs with The Home Depot »

The nation’s leading competitive energy provider, Exelon, is currently looking for ambitious veterans to join its team. Exelon has demonstrated a commitment to those who have served through its veterans services and extensive recruiting out of the military community. In fact, over 10% of its current workforce hold a veteran status.

See all maintenance jobs with Exelon »

In a scathing letter, a top Navy legal official on Sunday expressed "grave ethical concerns" over revelations that government prosecutors used tracking software in emails to defense lawyers in ongoing cases involving two Navy SEALs in San Diego.

The letter, written by David G. Wilson, Chief of Staff of the Navy's Defense Service Offices, requested a response by Tuesday from the Chief of the Navy's regional law offices detailing exactly what type of software was used and what it could do, who authorized it, and what controls were put in place to limit its spread on government networks.

"As our clients learn about these extraordinary events in the media, we are left unarmed with any facts to answer their understandable concerns about our ability to secure the information they must trust us to maintain. This situation has become untenable," Wilson wrote in the letter, which was obtained by Task & Purpose on Monday.

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Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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For nearly four decades, combat units have painted their insignias on boulders near the road into this post. It's known as Painted Rocks.

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