6 industries droning out the competition

popular
University of Arkansas - Fort Smith: A Modern Approach To Education

Sure, you know drones can drop bombs and wipe out small towns and gather intel, to include whether your neighbor is laying out on the deck again. Beyond that, drones have largely just been a killer Christmas gift. But rest assured, young gamer, there is real and practical application for your drone habit outside of the defense world, and it could just land you a job.

In a study by the Association for Unmanned Vehicles Systems International, the unmanned aircraft systems industry is forecast to create more than 600 jobs and nearly $500 million in economic impact in Arkansas alone in the next 10 years. But howwwwww?


Here are 6 industries currently using drones:

1. Marketing and photography

Of course your drone is great at taking that epic group shot that your selfie-stick just couldn't do. They are also revolutionizing the photography and marketing worlds. With unprecedented access, wildlife, ocean and skyline photos are better than ever. Drones can also make a mean video for real-estate ventures, tourism, college campuses, actually really anything and everything. Drones are making brand and marketing campaigns better than ever.

2. Logistics

You've heard the rumors that someday soon, every package you order from that beautiful corporate behemoth that is Amazon will arrive via drone. From pizza delivery to warehouse organizing, drones are really taking off (see what we did there?) in the logistics sector. Supply chain management and drones go hand in hand, and it's only going to get bigger.

3. Agriculture

Everyone loves the visual of a farmer riding his tractor among his crops into the sunset. So what about a 25 year old, making bank, sitting in a sweet office flying a drone from his desk doing some of the farm chores? Samesies. Drones can monitor crop growth, increase crop yields, help plan and troubleshoot irrigation systems, and are bringing efficiencies to farming that American Gothic never could have predicted.

4. Architecture

If you loved building Legos as a kid, then architecture might be the field for you. Drones are revolutionizing the way that areas, especially difficult or challenging terrains, are surveyed, making site planning easier and faster. Site mapping is done remotely, saving all the monies for companies to do things they want to, like putting in slides instead of stairs.

According to ArchDaily, "While using satellite imagery for site planning is common among architects, these visuals are often available in low resolution and produce less accurate data. Data collected by drones can completely eliminate the need for hiring land surveyors for creating topographic surveys. Instead, architects can use this information to build accurate 3D models of the terrain and site and import them directly into drafting and modeling software like Rhino."

Plus, slides.

5. Infrastructure Maintenance

Nothing says awesome job like being asked to climb to the top of a rickety bridge or water tower. You survived combat, you don't want to go out in some small town in the Midwest mounting a power line. Luckily, drones are doing those things for us now. According to Power Engineering, drones are really killing it (our words, not theirs). From transmission and distribution lines to dam inspections and everything in between, drones are saving millions of dollars and countless lives.

Fist bump from the taxpayers.

6. Forestry

"Only you can prevent forest fires!" Lies, Smoky. Drones can, too. With their unfettered access, drones can quickly count trees, map areas, spot tree diseases and identify fire risks and hotzones, Don't believe us? Watch this sweet video about drones in forestry.

The future of the drone industry is limitless, which also means the future of job security in the drone industry is as sure as getting that paycheck from Uncle Sam every two weeks. No matter your MOS, the University of Arkansas Fort Smith has a place for you in their Unmanned Aerial Systems degree program. Be a part of the UAFS tribe, and be a part of the future of drones.

This post sponsored by University of Arkansas Fort Smith

A Syrian commando-in-training applies the safety on his rifle during basic rifle marksmanship training in Syria, July 20, 2019. (U.S. Army/Spc. Alec Dionne)

The U.S. government failed to effectively account for nearly $715.8 million in weapons and equipment allocated to Syrian partners as part of the multinational counter-ISIS fight, according to a new report from the Defense Department inspector general.

Read More
REUTERS/Scott Audette/File Photo

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii), has long been seen as an apologist for Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, whom she met during a secret trip to Damascus in January 2017.

Most recently, a video was posted on Twitter shows Gabbard evading a question about whether Assad is a war criminal.

Since Gabbard is the only actively serving member of the military who is running for president — she is a major in the Hawaii Army National Guard — Task & Purpose sought to clarify whether she believes Assad has used chlorine gas and chemical weapons to kill his own people.

Read More
Barrett's bolt-action Multi-Role Adaptive Design (MRAD) system (Courtesy photo)

The Army is almost doubling its purchase of new bolt-action Precision Sniper Rifles as its primary anti-personnel sniper system of choice, according to budget documents.

Read More
The GAU-5A Aircrew Self Defense Weapon (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Air Force gunsmiths recently completed delivery of a new M4-style carbine designed to break down small enough to fit under most pilot ejection seats.

Read More
(Navy photo / Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jess Lewis)

NEWPORT -- The Office of Naval Inspector General has cleared former Naval War College president Rear Adm. Jeffrey A. Harley of most of the allegations of misconduct claimed to have occurred after he took command of the 136-year-old school in July 2016, The Providence Journal has learned.

Harley, in one of a series of interviews with the The Journal, called the findings "deeply gratifying." He said many of the most sensational allegations -- "offers of 'free hugs' and games of Twister in his office" -- reflected a misunderstanding of his sense of humor, which he describes as "quirky," but which he says was intended to ease tensions in what can be a stressful environment.

The allegations, reported last year by the Associated Press, prompted a national controversy that led to Harley leaving the college presidency after almost three years in office.

Read More