6 industries droning out the competition

popular
University of Arkansas - Fort Smith: A Modern Approach To Education

Sure, you know drones can drop bombs and wipe out small towns and gather intel, to include whether your neighbor is laying out on the deck again. Beyond that, drones have largely just been a killer Christmas gift. But rest assured, young gamer, there is real and practical application for your drone habit outside of the defense world, and it could just land you a job.

In a study by the Association for Unmanned Vehicles Systems International, the unmanned aircraft systems industry is forecast to create more than 600 jobs and nearly $500 million in economic impact in Arkansas alone in the next 10 years. But howwwwww?


Here are 6 industries currently using drones:

1. Marketing and photography

Of course your drone is great at taking that epic group shot that your selfie-stick just couldn't do. They are also revolutionizing the photography and marketing worlds. With unprecedented access, wildlife, ocean and skyline photos are better than ever. Drones can also make a mean video for real-estate ventures, tourism, college campuses, actually really anything and everything. Drones are making brand and marketing campaigns better than ever.

2. Logistics

You've heard the rumors that someday soon, every package you order from that beautiful corporate behemoth that is Amazon will arrive via drone. From pizza delivery to warehouse organizing, drones are really taking off (see what we did there?) in the logistics sector. Supply chain management and drones go hand in hand, and it's only going to get bigger.

3. Agriculture

Everyone loves the visual of a farmer riding his tractor among his crops into the sunset. So what about a 25 year old, making bank, sitting in a sweet office flying a drone from his desk doing some of the farm chores? Samesies. Drones can monitor crop growth, increase crop yields, help plan and troubleshoot irrigation systems, and are bringing efficiencies to farming that American Gothic never could have predicted.

4. Architecture

If you loved building Legos as a kid, then architecture might be the field for you. Drones are revolutionizing the way that areas, especially difficult or challenging terrains, are surveyed, making site planning easier and faster. Site mapping is done remotely, saving all the monies for companies to do things they want to, like putting in slides instead of stairs.

According to ArchDaily, "While using satellite imagery for site planning is common among architects, these visuals are often available in low resolution and produce less accurate data. Data collected by drones can completely eliminate the need for hiring land surveyors for creating topographic surveys. Instead, architects can use this information to build accurate 3D models of the terrain and site and import them directly into drafting and modeling software like Rhino."

Plus, slides.

5. Infrastructure Maintenance

Nothing says awesome job like being asked to climb to the top of a rickety bridge or water tower. You survived combat, you don't want to go out in some small town in the Midwest mounting a power line. Luckily, drones are doing those things for us now. According to Power Engineering, drones are really killing it (our words, not theirs). From transmission and distribution lines to dam inspections and everything in between, drones are saving millions of dollars and countless lives.

Fist bump from the taxpayers.

6. Forestry

"Only you can prevent forest fires!" Lies, Smoky. Drones can, too. With their unfettered access, drones can quickly count trees, map areas, spot tree diseases and identify fire risks and hotzones, Don't believe us? Watch this sweet video about drones in forestry.

The future of the drone industry is limitless, which also means the future of job security in the drone industry is as sure as getting that paycheck from Uncle Sam every two weeks. No matter your MOS, the University of Arkansas Fort Smith has a place for you in their Unmanned Aerial Systems degree program. Be a part of the UAFS tribe, and be a part of the future of drones.

This post sponsored by University of Arkansas Fort Smith

Seven of the twelve Soldiers participating in the Army National Guard Military Funeral Honors Level 2 course at Fort Indiantown Gap practice folding the flag April 25. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Zane Craig)

Retired Army Master Sgt. Mark Allen has died 10 years after he was shot in the head while searching for deserter Pvt. Bowe Bergdahl in Afghanistan.

Allen died on Saturday at the age of 46, according to funeral information posted online.

Read More Show Less

For U.S. service members who have fought alongside the Kurds, President Donald Trump's decision to approve repositioning U.S. forces in Syria ahead of Turkey's invasion is a naked betrayal of valued allies.

"I am ashamed for the first time in my career," one unnamed special operator told Fox News Jennifer Griffin.

In a Twitter thread that went viral, Griffin wrote the soldier told her the Kurds were continuing to support the United States by guarding tens of thousands of ISIS prisoners even though Turkey had nullified an arrangement under which U.S. and Turkish troops were conducting joint patrols in northeastern Syria to allow the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, to withdraw.

"The Kurds are sticking by us," the soldier told Griffin. "No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us."

Read More Show Less
Defense Secretary Mark Esper (Associated Press photo)

Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Sunday he and the Pentagon will comply with House Democrats' impeachment inquiry subpoena, but it'll be on their own schedule.

"We will do everything we can to cooperate with the Congress," Esper said on CBS' "Face the Nation." "Just in the last week or two, my general counsel sent out a note — as we typically do in these situations — to ensure documents are retained."

Read More Show Less

Most of the U.S. troops in Syria are being moved out of the country as Turkish forces and their Arab allies push further into Kurdish territory than originally expected, Task & Purpose has learned.

Roughly 1,000 U.S. troops are withdrawing from Syria, leaving a residual force of between 100 and 150 service members at the Al Tanf garrison, a U.S. official said.

"I spoke with the president last night after discussions with the rest of the national security team and he directed that we begin a deliberate withdrawal of forces from northern Syria," Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Sunday's edition of CBS News' "Face the Nation."'

Read More Show Less

BEIRUT/ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Women affiliated with Islamic State and their children fled en masse from a camp where they were being held in northern Syria on Sunday after shelling by Turkish forces in a five-day-old offensive, the region's Kurdish-led administration said.

Turkey's cross-border attack in northern Syria against Kurdish forces widened to target the town of Suluk which was hit by Ankara's Syrian rebel allies. There were conflicting accounts on the outcome of the fighting.

Turkey is facing threats of possible sanctions from the United States unless it calls off the incursion. Two of its NATO allies, Germany and France, have said they are halting weapons exports to Turkey. The Arab League has denounced the operation.

Read More Show Less