These 6 Outstanding Companies Want To Hire You And Your Logistics Experience

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Members of the 55th Logistic Readiness Squadron Small Air Terminal section prepare to load humanitarian supplies onto a C-17 Globemaster at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., Dec. 9, 2016. The supplies are made possible by the Denton Program, which allows the use of extra space on U.S. military cargo aircraft to transport humanitarian assistance materials.
U.S. Air Force photo by by Zachary Hada.

The old saying that “amateurs talk tactics; professionals talk logistics” is as true in business as it is in the military. Whether a company needs to get products onto store shelves or spare parts to vital customers, it all comes down to logistics. No matter what your MOS was, you spent a lot of your military career on logistics. Put that experience to good use with these great companies today.


Former soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines who spent their military tours focusing on logistics and manufacturing tasks will find their skills transferrable to the jobs that Johnson Controls is looking to fill right now. Known for its military-friendly culture, Johnson Controls has pledged to hire veterans as member of the Veterans Jobs Mission coalition.

See all jobs with Johnson Controls »

Airgas, the largest U.S. distributor of industrial, medical and specialty gases, is looking for qualified service members to join its team. Known for its military-friendly policies and dedication to military causes such as Operation Homefront, Airgas is a great company for veterans to consider as they move into the private sector.

See all jobs with Airgas »

With over 50,000 associates around the globe, B. Braun Medical Inc. is a worldwide healthcare supplier with a reputation of being a great supporter of the military, veterans, and their family members. B. Braun has also been recognized as one of the top 25 “Best Places to Work” by Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry magazine.

See all jobs with B. Braun Medical Inc. »

Schneider Electric, a global specialist in energy management and automation, is a great company for veterans to explore for their next career move. With a robust veterans recruiting program, Schneider is known for its attention to detail and dedication to helping employees learn, grow, and thrive.

See all jobs with Schneider Electric »

BJ's Wholesale Club, the first retailer to introduce the warehouse club concept in the northeastern United States, is a great company for veterans looking to join a passionate team of individuals. At BJ’s, veterans will find unlimited opportunities for career growth, tremendous earning potential, and colleagues and management that will recognize and reward their achievements.

See all jobs with BJ’s Wholesale Club »

Walgreens, one of the nation’s top pharmacies and wellness and beauty companies, is currently looking for transitioning service members or veterans to fill their distribution center roles. The company also offers the W-Vets Business Resource Group (BRG): A grassroots network of current Walgreens team members, this network is comprised of former veteran and military service members, active National Guard and Reserve service members, and military and veteran supporters, W-Vets offers networking, peer mentoring, professional development and community service opportunities, to help Walgreens build upon a deeply rooted tradition of supporting those who have proudly served.

See all jobs with Walgreens »

A student, attending the Burlington County Institute of Technology Medford public school, uses Navy Recruiting Command's virtual reality asset, the Nimitz, during the Philadelphia Swarm. A Swarm event is a large-scale recruiting effort run by the nation's top Navy recruiters to saturate a specified market with Navy outreach, information and recruiting assets Dec. 11, 2019 (Navy photo/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Diana Quinlan)

MEDFORD — The Navy does more than drive boats, but recruiters say students won't just learn that from reading a brochure nowadays.

The Nimitz, a virtual reality-filled tractor trailer used by recruiters, made its way to Burlington County Institute of Technology's Medford campus Wednesday, putting teenagers at the wheel of a boat through simulations of missions.

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U.S. Air Force airmen from the 405th Expeditionary Support Squadron work together to clear debris inside the passenger terminal the day after a Taliban-led attack at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Dec. 12, 2019. (U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Brandon Cribelar)

Blasts from Taliban car bombs outside of Bagram Airfield on Wednesday caused extensive damage to the base's passenger terminal, new pictures released by the 45th Expeditionary Wing show.

The pictures, which are part of a photo essay called "Bagram stands fast," were posted on the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service's website on Thursday.

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The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, June 17, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Shortly after seven sailors died aboard USS Fitzgerald when she collided with a merchant ship off Japan in 2017, I wrote that the Fitzgerald's watch team could have been mine. My ship had once had a close call with me on watch, and I had attempted to explain how such a thing could happen. "Operating ships at sea is hard, and dangerous. Stand enough watches, and you'll have close calls," I wrote at the time. "When the Fitzgerald's investigation comes out, I, for one, will likely be forgiving."

The investigations, both public and private, are out, and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently released a report assessing the changes to training implemented since the collisions.

So, am I forgiving? Yes — for some.

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Belgian nurse Augusta Chiwy, left, talks with author and military historian Martin King moments before receiving an award for valor from the U.S. Army, in Brussels, Dec. 12, 2011. (Associated Press/Yves Logghe)

Editor's note: a version of this story first appeared in 2015.

Most people haven't heard of an elderly Belgian-Congolese nurse named Augusta Chiwy. But students of history know that adversity and dread can turn on a dime into freedom and change, and it's often the most humble and little-known individuals who are the drivers of it.

During the very darkest days of the Battle of the Bulge in World War II, Chiwy was such a catalyst, and hundreds of Americans lived because of her. She died quietly on Aug. 23, 2015, at the age of 94 at her home in Brussels, Belgium, and had it not been for the efforts of my friend — British military historian Martin King — the world may never have heard her astonishing story.

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A Ukrainian serviceman watches from his position at the new line of contact in Zolote, Luhansk region, eastern Ukraine Nov. 2, 2019 (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

More than $20 million of the Pentagon aid at the center of the impeachment fight still hasn't reached Ukraine.

The continued delay undermines a key argument against impeachment from President Trump's Republican allies and a new legal memo from the White House Office of Management and Budget.

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