7 Perfect Photos Of Marine NCOs Getting Their Sh*t Rocked

Joining the Military
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Bryan Luna, team chief with Detachment N, 3rd Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force - Crisis Response - Central Command 16.2, conducts an Oleoresin Capsicum qualification course at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Aug. 27, 2016.
Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Donald Holbert

Just because you become a non-commissioned officer doesn’t mean life becomes any easier. As you rise through the ranks, the responsibilities become heavier, and the physical training is just as brutal as ever.


“As NCOs we are supposed to be able to take a deep and honest look at ourselves before we even begin to think about our role in cultivating junior Marines,” Sgt. Steve Ezzell said in a Marine Corps news release after a rough NCO PT session in Quantico, Virginia. There, Marine NCOs learned not to rest on their laurels because “their work never stops.”

Sometimes, taking an honest look at yourself as an NCO means getting your shit rocked by fellow Marines, unit commanders, and a little pepper spray. And lucky for us, the military stores photos of NCOs getting wrecked for all the public to see on its Defense Video and Imagery Distribution System hub. Here are our seven favorites.

Sometimes you get KO’d in a choke hold.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Melissa Eschenbrenner

Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Jeremy Meadows holds a Marine in a headlock while grappling at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., April 22, 2013. A martial arts instructor trainer, Meadows is one of only a few second-degree black belts assigned to the air station.

Martial arts training can make you look like idiot.

(Photo by Jeremy Beale)

Marine Corps NCOs practice martial arts techniques during the physical training session.

Your commanding officer might make you kick a punching bag in a forest.

(Photo by Jeremy Beale)

Marine Corps NCOs incorporate combat techniques from the Marine Corps Mixed Martial Arts Program into their physical training session.

Earning a grey belt can be embarrassing.

Marine Corps photo

Sgt. Franco Loza III, food service specialist, Food Service Company, Combat Logistics Regiment 17, 1st Marine Logistics Group, tests Marines for their grey belt in Marine Corps Martial Arts Program at Camp Pendleton, Calif., April 1. 

You might get punched out on someone’s front lawn (or have to pretend to).

Marine Corps photo

Marine Corps Base Quantico, VA - Marines from the Marine Corps Mixed Martial Arts Program take E-9 attendees through an in depth demonstration of combat tactics used in real life scenarios.

Pepper spray straight to the face can really mess up your ability to train.

Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Donald Holbert

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Bryan Luna, team chief with Detachment N, 3rd Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force - Crisis Response - Central Command 16.2, conducts an Oleoresin Capsicum qualification course at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, Aug. 27, 2016.

But when it’s over, you can hose off and cry at home, alone, in peace.

Marine Corps photo

Staff Sgt. Chad J. Herbert, an operations chief with Golf Battery, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, rinses his face after being exposed to oleoresin capsicum (a more potent form of pepper spray) during the culminating event of the unit's public disorder and non-lethal weapons employment training here, Jan. 24.

Purple Heart Medals are displayed during a Purple Heart ceremony at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Nov. 21, 2019. (Marine Corps photo/Cpl. Ana S. Madrigal)

Ronald Botch didn't want to talk about the war when he returned five decades ago from Vietnam, where he suffered a broken pelvis and nerve damage to his leg.

With the conflict dragging on and no end in sight in 1968, the war had become deeply unpopular and inspired protests across the country. Many soldiers, like Botch, didn't feel welcome when they returned home.

"They were protesting and calling us baby killers and stuff like that," the Salisbury Township resident said Monday.

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Navy veteran Paul Burbridge is interviewed next to the box of the cremated remains of James H. Mitchell Jr., which he found under the stairwell of an apartment complex he was cleaning. Mitchell was a Marine who served in Korea in the 1950s and died in 2000. Burbridge took it upon himself to give Mitchell a proper burial. (Screengrab via MLive.com)

KALAMAZOO, MI — A veteran himself, Paul Burbridge believes those who served our country deserve an honorable burial.

While cleaning at Deer Run Apartments in Kalamazoo, Burbridge found a box of cremated remains with the name James H. Mitchell Jr. on the box.

Through some investigation of his own, Burbridge discovered the remains he found under a stairwell in the complex were those of a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served during the Korean War from 1952 to 1954.

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In a Galaxy — err, I mean, on a military base far, far away, soldiers are standing in solidarity with galactic freedom fighters.

Sitting at the top of an Army press release from March 2019, regarding the East Africa Response Force's deployment to Gabon, the photo seems, at first glance, just like any other: Soldiers on the move.

But if you look closer at the top right, you'll find something spectacular: A Rebel Alliance flag.

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The maiden flight of the first CMV-22B Osprey took place in Amarillo, Texas (Courtesy photo)

The first of the CMV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft the Navy plans on adopting as its carrier onboard delivery (COD) aircraft of choice has successfully completed its first flight operations, manufacturer Boeing announced on Tuesday.

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Three sailors from the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower have been charged in connection with the Dec. 17 brawl at a holiday party in Norfolk, Virginia, that was caught on video.

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