82-Year-Old Navy Vet Sings Drowning Pool’s ‘Bodies’ On TV Show, Chaos Ensues

Entertainment
"Let the bodies hit the flooooooooor."
Screen grab from YouTube

Sweet grandpas are a dime a dozen. Everywhere you look, there they are: tending to their gardens; waving at cars; handing out butterscotch candies to the kids in the neighborhood. (Boring!) But once in a blue moon, a grandpa comes along who shatters the mold — defying expectations by learning how to skydive, say, or use an iPhone.


John Hetlinger, an 82-year-old former Navy pilot, is one such grandpa, and he’s taking the world by storm.

On June 7, Hetlinger appeared on NBC’s hit show “America’s Got Talent,” a kill-or-be-killed proving ground for aspiring musicians, to sing a song. Wearing a white polo shirt and a pair of khakis pulled up to his nipple line, Hetlinger unleashed a hot-blooded rendition of Drowning Pool’s 2002 classic death metal ballad, “Bodies.”

The reaction from the audience was mixed, with some people shielding their ears from Hetlinger’s terrifying banshee screams, while many jumped to their feet in a fist-pumping frenzy. Nevertheless, the performance earned Hetlinger a standing ovation — and even a little smile from the evil Simon Cowell, America’s gatekeeper of dreams.   

Watch his epic performance below.

Afghan security forces inspect the site of an attack in a U.S. military air base in Bagram, north of Kabul, Afghanistan December 11, 2019. (REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail)

KABUL (Reuters) - Suicide bombers struck the main U.S. military base in Afghanistan on Wednesday, killing at least one person and injuring scores in a major attack that could scupper plans to revive peace talks between the United States and the Taliban.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which struck the Bagram air base north of Kabul.

"First, a heavy-duty Mazda vehicle struck the wall of the American base," said Zabihullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman. "Later several mujahideen equipped with light and heavy weapons were able to attack the American occupiers."

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(Associated Press/Tom Williams)

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The Pentagon will implement an "operational pause" on the training of foreign students inside the United States as the military undergoes a review of screening procedures, according to senior defense officials.

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In this Nov 24, 2009, file photo, a University of Phoenix billboard is shown in Chandler, Ariz. The University of Phoenix for-profit college and its parent company will pay $50 million and cancel $141 million in student debt to settle allegations of deceptive advertisement brought by the Federal Trade Commission. (AP Photo/Matt York)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The University of Phoenix, which is owned by Apollo Education Group, has agreed to pay $191 million to settle charges that it falsely advertised close ties with major U.S. companies that could lead to jobs for students, the Federal Trade Commission said on Tuesday.

The University of Phoenix will pay $50 million to the FTC to return to consumers and cancel $141 million in student debt.

Some of the advertisements targeted military and Hispanic students, the FTC said.

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Shane Reynolds, UCF Research Associate demonstrates an AR/VR system to train soldiers and Marines on how to improve their ability to detect improvised explosive devices. (Orlando Sentinel/Ricardo Ramirez Buxeda)

As UCF research associate Shane Reynolds guides his avatar over a virtual minefield using his iPad, small beeps and whistles reveal the location of the scourge of the modern war zone: Improvised Explosive Devices, or IEDs. He must take his time to sweep every last inch of the playing field to make sure his character doesn't miss any of the often-deadly bombs.

Despite his slow pace, Reynolds makes a small misstep and with a kaboom! a bomb blows up his player, graphically scattering body parts.

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