9 Companies With Jobs To Launch Your Career In Tech

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U.S. Air Force Photo

Technology is ubiquitous — it pervades every aspect of our lives. It’s no wonder that job growth in the tech industry has outpaced private sector job growth by a rate of three to one since 2004.  In a 2012 study by the Bay Area Economic Institute, tech jobs earn between 17% to 27% more other fields, have a low unemployment rate, and offer a demand that will steadily increase through at least the year 2020.


That’s why transitioning service members and veterans in the job market should consider careers in the field of technology. We’ve highlighted nine companies below that are actively seeking veterans for tech openings located around the country.

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IBM is the world’s largest information technology company with more than 360,000 employees serving clients in 170 countries.

See all tech jobs with IBM »

Oracle specializes in developing and marketing database software and technology, cloud engineered systems, and enterprise software products.

See all tech jobs with Oracle »

TEKsystems provides corporations with IT staffing, talent management expertise, and IT services, enabling them to meet their business objective.

See all tech jobs with TEKsystems »

Accenture is a leading global professional services company, providing a broad range of services and solutions.

See all tech jobs with Accenture »

Aquent helps leading companies achieve their goals by connecting them with talented marketing, creative, and digital professionals on a contract basis.

See all tech jobs with Aquent »

Fiserv has been a trusted name in financial services technology for more than 30 years through our innovative solutions and deep expertise.

See all tech jobs with Fiserv »

eBay is a global commerce platform and payments leader connecting millions of buyers and sellers.

See all tech jobs with eBay »

EMC is a global leader in IT products and services. We have 60,000 people worldwide driving IT transformation for the world's largest enterprises and government.

See all tech jobs with EMC »

Intel has transformed from a company that primarily served the PC industry, to one now also powering the majority of the world’s data centers, connecting hundreds of millions of mobile and Internet of Things devices, and helping to secure and protect enterprise and government IT systems.

See all tech jobs with Intel »

U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Sandra Welch

This article originally appeared on Military.com.

Inside Forward Operating Base Oqab in Kabul, Afghanistan stands a wall painted with a mural of an airman kneeling before a battlefield cross. Beneath it, a black gravestone bookended with flowers and dangling dog tags displays the names of eight U.S. airmen and an American contractor killed in a horrific insider attack at Kabul International Airport in 2011.

It's one of a number of such memorials ranging from plaques, murals and concrete T-walls scattered across Afghanistan. For the last eight years, those tributes have been proof to the families of the fallen that their loved ones have not been forgotten. But with a final U.S. pullout from Afghanistan possibly imminent, those families fear the combat-zone memorials may be lost for good.

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DOD photo

After a string of high profile incidents, the commander overseeing the Navy SEALs released an all hands memo stating that the elite Naval Special Warfare community has a discipline problem, and pinned the blame on those who place loyalty to their teammates over the Navy and the nation they serve.

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Ed Mahoney/Kickstarter

In June 2011 Iraq's defense minister announced that U.S. troops who had deployed to the country would receive the Iraq Commitment Medal in recognition of their service. Eight years later, millions of qualified veterans have yet to receive it.

The reason: The Iraqi government has so far failed to provide the medals to the Department of Defense for approval and distribution.

A small group of veterans hopes to change that.

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F-16 Fighting Falcon (Photo: US Air Force)

For a cool $8.5 million, you could be the proud owner of a "fully functioning" F-16 A/B Fighting Falcon fighter jet that a South Florida company acquired from Jordan.

The combat aircraft, which can hit a top speed of 1,357 mph at 40,000 feet, isn't showroom new — it was built in 1980. But it still has a max range of 2,400 miles and an initial climb rate of 62,000 feet per minute and remains militarized, according to The Drive, an automotive website that also covers defense topics, WBDO News 96.5 reported Wednesday.

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