A South Carolina veteran is suing his homeowner association over his right to fly the American flag

news
Public domain

A North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, veteran is suing his home owners association after being denied the right to fly an American flag on a freestanding pole, according to a lawsuit filed this week.


Robert Huey, a U.S. Air Force veteran, and Dashenna Huey asked permission to fly an American flag on a portable and removable flagpole, but were denied by Palms 5th Avenue Homeowners Association Inc., the lawsuit states.

The HOA's Architectural Review Board said the flagpole and flag would "quickly dominate the appearance" of the neighborhood, where the allowed small flag mounts on a home "confine the appearance and ownership of the flag to that residence, according to the lawsuit. The board said the flag could lead to a contest between property owners as to "who has the largest flagpole or the best flagpole" and that flags could be raised that others may find offensive, like a Confederate battle flag, the suit states.

The Hueys claim the reasons for not allowing the flag on a flagpole are arbitrary, capricious and unreasonable, the suit states.

In the HOA's covenants and restrictions, the lawsuit states, there are no guidelines or rules relating to displaying the American flag by an owner. The suit goes on to say the architectural board claims the flag is a sign prohibited by the covenants and restrictions.

South Carolina law states: "Regardless of any restrictive covenant, declaration, rule, contractual provision or other requirement concerning flags or decorations found in a deed, contract, lease, rental agreement, or homeowners' association document, any homeowner or tenant may display one portable, removable United States flag in a respectful manner."

The Palms 5th Avenue HOA was originally Carriage Oaks Property Owners Association in 1999, the lawsuit states.

———

©2019 The Sun News (Myrtle Beach, S.C.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

SEE ALSO: A Homeowner's Association Tried To Limit When Residents Could Fly The American Flag. These Veterans Said Hell No

WATCH NEXT: Flag Raising At Iwo Jima

A screenshot from the video (Twitter)

Video posted on social media appears to show the wreckage of a U.S. aircraft that went down on Monday in Ghanzi province Afghanistan, which is partly controlled by the Taliban.

Read More
U.S. Marines with 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines assigned to the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Central Command (SPMAGTF-CR-CC) 19.2, observe protestors toss Molotov Cocktails over the wall of the Baghdad Embassy Compound in Iraq, Dec. 31, 2019. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Kyle C. Talbot)

One person was injured by Sunday's rocket attack on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, Task & Purpose was learned. The injury was described as mild and no one was medically evacuated from the embassy following the attack.

Read More
The front gate of Dachau (Pixabay/Lapping)

At age 23 in the spring of 1945, Guy Prestia was in the Army fighting his way across southern Germany when his unit walked into hell on earth — the Nazi death camp at Dachau.

"It was terrible. I never saw anything like those camps," said Prestia, 97, who still lives in his hometown of Ellwood City.

Read More
The U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) underway on its own power for the first time while leaving Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia (USA), on April 8, 2017. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ridge Leoni)

Against a blistering 56 mph wind, an F/A-18F Super Hornet laden with fuel roared off the flight deck of the aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford and into the brilliant January sky.

No glitches.

Chalk up another step forward for America's newest and most expensive warship.

The Ford has been at sea since Jan. 16, accompanied by Navy test pilots flying a variety of aircraft. They're taking off and landing on the ship's 5 acre flight deck, taking notes and gathering data that will prove valuable for generations of pilots to come.

The Navy calls it aircraft compatibility testing, and the process marks an important new chapter for a first-in-class ship that has seen its share of challenges.

"We're establishing the launch and recovery capabilities for the history of this class, which is pretty amazing," said Capt. J.J. "Yank" Cummings, the Ford's commanding officer. "The crew is extremely proud, and they recognize the historic context of this."

Read More
Soldiers from the 1-118th Field Artillery Regiment of the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team fire an M777 Howitzer during a fire mission in Southern Afghanistan, June 10th, 2019. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jordan Trent)

Once again, the United States and the Taliban are apparently close to striking a peace deal. Such a peace agreement has been rumored to be in the works longer than the latest "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" sequel. (The difference is Keanu Reeves has fewer f**ks to give than U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad.)

Both sides appeared to be close to reaching an agreement in September until the Taliban took credit for an attack that killed Army Sgt. 1st Class Elis A. Barreto Ortiz, of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. That prompted President Donald Trump to angrily cancel a planned summit with the Taliban that had been scheduled to take place at Camp David, Maryland, on Sept. 8.

Now Taliban spokesman Suhail Shaheen has told a Pakistani newspaper that he is "optimistic" that the Taliban could reach an agreement with U.S. negotiators by the end of January.

Read More