Afghan man behind 2016 New York and New Jersey bombings convicted for gun battle with NJ police

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In this Dec. 20, 2016 file photo, Ahmad Khan Rahimi, the man accused of setting off bombs in New Jersey and New York's Chelsea neighborhood, sits in court in Elizabeth, N.J. Rahimi, an Islamic terrorist already serving a life prison term for a bombing in New York City, was convicted Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, of multiple counts of attempted murder and assault stemming from a shootout with police three years ago in New Jersey. (Associated Press/Mel Evans)

NEW YORK — A New Jersey jury convicted an Afghani immigrant of attempted murder Tuesday for a 2016 Garden State gunfight with police that left him bleeding and under arrest.

Defendant Ahmad Khan Rahimi sat silently after the guilty verdicts were delivered inside an Elizabeth, N.J., courthouse to end the jury's second day of deliberations.


The jury rejected the defense contention that the naturalized U.S. citizen acted in self-defense during the gunfight on the streets of Linden, N.J., as cops hunted the suspect in an earlier bombing in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood.

Thirty-one people were injured in the New York blast, and a second bomb set in the neighborhood by the Afghanistan native failed to detonate three years ago. The Chelsea bomb was packed with ball bearings and steel nuts intended to inflict maximum damage once the bomb detonated.

Prosecutors alleged that Rahimi also planted a small pipe bomb along the route of a Marine Corps road race down the Jersey Shore in Seaside Park. No one was injured by that device.

Rahimi was shot seven times in the gun battle with the Jersey cops as he went on the run after the two bombings, winding up the streets of Linden as he tried to avoid arrest.

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©2019 New York Daily News. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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