The Air Force blew up tons of explosives seized from a single Florida man

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Members of the 6th Civil Engineer Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and other local and state authorities, oversee a controlled detonation at the Avon Park Air Force Range, Fla., Sept. 9, 2019. The ATF seized more than 7,000 pounds of explosives from a prior convicted felon in the largest explosives seizure in Florida history (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Caleb Nunez)

Authorities safely destroyed thousands of pounds of explosives last month that were seized from a Sarasota, Floridaman.


According to the U.S. Air Force Civil Engineers, about 7,700 pounds of explosive fuses and flash powder were detonated Sept. 9 at the Avon Park Air Force Range.

The explosives were seized in early 2018 from Marc Jason Levene following an investigation.

The Air Force partnered with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives on the operation and called it the largest seizure of explosives in Florida history.

Levene was sentenced to five years in prison in 2018 after pleading guilty to being a felon in possession of explosives.

He was selling the explosives online and storing them in a shed behind his home and at a storage unit.

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©2019 Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Fla.. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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