Air Force Develops New Way For Fighter Pilots To Piss Their Pants At 30,000 Feet

Military Tech
F-35A Elephant Walk at Hill AFB

Most of us take our bathroom breaks for granted, but it's more complicated for fighter pilots who fly an aircraft for hours at a time.


The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center's Human Systems Division is working closely with aircrews and industry experts to develop and improve bladder relief devices — especially for female pilots. The group is updating the device through a joint effort with Vermont-based contractor Omni Medical Systems.

The division began delivering the Aircrew Mission Extender Device — known as AMXDmax — earlier this year. More than 600 devices have been put in the field so far, and another 1,500 are scheduled for delivery in the next six months, according to the Air Force.

The new devices are hands-free, battery operated and worn underneath uniforms. The device collects urine in a cup for males and a pad for females. It then pumps it into a collection bag. Embedded with sensors, the device quickly detects urine within one second and pumps it into the collection bag. It can hold a total of 1.7 quarts of urine.

"Urinary [relief] devices are the number one priority that female aircrews have when it comes to mission equipment," said Lt. Col. Elaine Bryant, deputy director of the Human Systems Division. "They are a vast improvement over the legacy relief devices that many aircrews are currently using. The battery life is longer, it holds more urine, the pads are better, the cups are better and overall it's more anatomically correct."

The device can actually save lives, Mark Bernier, program manager for the Aircrew Mission Extender Device, told The Dayton Daily News. He said he's passionate about constantly improving the bladder device for fighter pilots, which ultimately helps them focus on the missions they fly.

The AMXD was developed to stop pilots from practicing "tactical dehydration," Bernier said. In the past, pilots would drink less water to limit urine output during a flight — which can be a fatal mistake. Dehydration fatally impacts G-tolerance, situational awareness and decision-making ability for pilots maneuvering highly sophisticated fighter jets.

"The AMXDmax allows pilots to hydrate properly and relieve their bladder mid-flight, without interrupting the mission," according to Omni Medical Systems.

The Human Systems Division also helps train aircrews in the proper usage of the devices.

———

©2019 the Dayton Daily News (Dayton, Ohio). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

SEE ALSO: The CIA Had A Top-Secret Manual To Help U-2 Pilots Avoid Crapping Their Pants At 70,000 Feet

WATCH NEXT:


(U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Airman 1st Class Corey Hook)

Editor's Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Department of Veterans Affairs released an alarming report Friday showing that at least 60,000 veterans died by suicide between 2008 and 2017, with little sign that the crisis is abating despite suicide prevention being the VA's top priority.

Although the total population of veterans declined by 18% during that span of years, more than 6,000 veterans died by suicide annually, according to the VA's 2019 National Veteran Suicide Prevention Annual Report.

Read More Show Less
President Donald Trump speaks during an event with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison at Pratt Industries, Sunday, Sept 22, 2019, in Wapakoneta, Ohio. (Associated Press/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump said on Sunday that he discussed Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden and his son in a call with Ukraine's president.

Trump's statement to reporters about his July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky came as the Democratic leader of a key congressional panel said the pursuit of Trump's impeachment may be the "only remedy" to the situation.

Read More Show Less
"It's kind of like the equivalent of dropping a soda can into canyon and putting on a blindfold and going and finding it, because you can't just look down and see it," diver Jeff Goodreau said of finding the wreck.

The USS Eagle 56 was only five miles off the coast of Maine when it exploded.

The World War I-era patrol boat split in half, then slipped beneath the surface of the North Atlantic. The Eagle 56 had been carrying a crew of 62. Rescuers pulled 13 survivors from the water that day. It was April 23, 1945, just two weeks before the surrender of Nazi Germany.

The U.S. Navy classified the disaster as an accident, attributing the sinking to a blast in the boiler room. In 2001, that ruling was changed to reflect the sinking as a deliberate act of war, perpetuated by German submarine U-853, a u-boat belonging to Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine.

Still, despite the Navy's effort to clarify the circumstances surrounding the sinking, the Eagle 56 lingered as a mystery. The ship had sunk relatively close to shore, but efforts to locate the wreck were futile for decades. No one could find the Eagle 56, a small patrol ship that had come so close to making it back home.

Then, a group of friends and amateur divers decided to try to find the wreck in 2014. After years of fruitless dives and intensive research, New England-based Nomad Exploration Team successfully located the Eagle 56 in June 2018.

Business Insider spoke to two crew members — meat truck driver Jeff Goodreau and Massachusetts Department of Corrections officer Donald Ferrara — about their discovery.

Read More Show Less
(CIA photo)

Before the 5th Special Forces Group's Operational Detachment Alpha 595, before 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment's MH-47E Chinooks, and before the Air Force combat controllers, there were a handful of CIA officers and a buttload of cash.

Read More Show Less

The last time the world saw Marine veteran Austin Tice, he had been taken prisoner by armed men. It was unclear whether his captors were jihadists or allies of Syrian dictator Bashar al Assad who were disguised as Islamic radicals.

Blindfolded and nearly out of breath, Tice spoke in Arabic before breaking into English:"Oh Jesus. Oh Jesus."

That was from a video posted on YouTube on Sept. 26, 2012, several weeks after Tice went missing near Damascus, Syria, while working as a freelance journalist for McClatchy and the Washington Post.

Now that Tice has been held in captivity for more than seven years, reporters who have regular access to President Donald Trump need to start asking him how he is going to bring Tice home.

Read More Show Less