Air Force major drowns in cruise ship swimming pool

news

An Air Force major drowned in a Caribbean Princess cruise ship pool Friday morning, the Broward Medical Examiner's Office said

Stephen Osakue, 37, worked for the Air Force as a research pharmacist, according to a statement by the Medical Examiner's Office on Monday. Osakue was based at Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi.


In an email statement, Princess Cruises spokesman Nagin Kamali said Osakue was found unresponsive in one of the ship's swimming pools about 5:15 a.m. Friday as the ship, which sails out of Port Everglades, was on the sixth day of a seven-day Western Caribbean voyage.

The ship's medical personnel were unable to revive him, Kamali said. "Appropriate authorities were notified and conducted an investigation. A final determination is pending, however authorities have indicated that this incident appears to be accidental."

Osakue's wife told investigators that "they had a lot to drink" prior to the drowning, but she was not with Osakue when he entered the pool, according to the Medical Examiner's Office's statement. A toxicology test will take at least a week.

Osakue drowned in the Caribbean Princess' Neptune Pool, the statement said.

Osakue's body was brought to Port Everglades and turned over to the Medical Examiner's Office on Saturday, the statement said. The body is now in the care of Life Event Center at Florida Memorial funeral home in Rockledge.

On an obituary posting, Life Event Center reported his birthplace as Miami. Services have not yet been scheduled, according to the site.

In a tribute on Facebook, Kim Kambeya wrote, "Maj. Stephen Osakue you will truly be missed. It was awesome being stationed together several times and keeping in touch. My heart hurts for you and your family."

Caribbean Princess, which has 1,556 guest cabins and employs a crew of 1,200, was launched in 2004 and is regarded as the "Grand Daddy" of the Princess Cruises fleet, according to Princess Cruise's website. Princess Cruises is owned by Carnival Corp. and plc, parent company of Carnival Cruise Line.

———

©2019 the Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

(U.S. Air Force photo)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. military on Sunday accused a Venezuelan fighter aircraft of "aggressively" shadowing a U.S. Navy EP-3 Aries II plane over international airspace, in yet another sign of the increasing hostility between the two nations.

The encounter between the U.S. and Venezuelan planes occurred on Friday, the same day that the Trump administration announced it was sanctioning four top officials in Venezuela's military counterintelligence agency.

Read More Show Less
In this March 12, 2016, file photo, Marines of the U.S., left, and South Korea, wearing blue headbands on their helmets, take positions after landing on a beach during the joint military combined amphibious exercise, called Ssangyong, part of the Key Resolve and Foal Eagle military exercises, in Pohang, South Korea. (Associated Press/Yonhap/Kim Jun-bum)

Joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises scheduled for next month are going ahead, a top Seoul official said Saturday, despite a threat by North Korea to boycott working-level talks with Washington and possibly restart nuclear and longer-range missile tests.

Read More Show Less

Video footage aired on Iranian state television on Saturday shows masked commandos rappelling from a helicopter onto a British tanker in the Strait of Hormuz.

Read More Show Less

(Reuters) - A former National Security Agency contractor was sentenced in Maryland to nine years in prison on Friday for stealing huge amounts of classified material from U.S. intelligence agencies over two decades though officials never found proof he shared it with anyone.

Read More Show Less
nsa

ASPEN -- The Pentagon is recruiting a new cadre of computer geeks to address a threat that the military's top intelligence officer says keeps him up at night.

Read More Show Less