Air Force PJ dies during mountain rescue training in Idaho

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Tech Sgt. Peter Kraines (U.S. Air Force photo)

An Air Force special tactics pararescueman with the 24th Special Operations Wing has died in a training accident in Idaho, the Air Force announced on Thursday.


Though the incident is still under investigation, the Air Force said Tech Sgt. Peter Kraines, 33, died from injuries he sustained while performing mountain rescue techniques in Boise on Tuesday.

As a Special Tactics pararescueman, Kraines was trained to conduct combat search and rescue and personnel recovery missions. Among his many awards and decorations are an Air Medal with one oak leaf cluster, an Air Force Commendation Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal and the Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon with Gold Border.

"This is a tragic loss to the Special Tactics community," said U.S. Air Force Col. Matthew Allen, commander of the 24th SOW. "We are grateful for the support from our community and our [Air Force Special Operations Command] teammates. Our thoughts are with his family, friends, and teammates at this time."

Kraines enlisted in the United States Air Force in March 2011 and immediately entered the two-year PJ training pipleliine, the Air Force said.

Upon completion of the program, Kraines was assigned to the 347th Rescue Group at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. He was eventually selected to join the 24th SOW and assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina in March 2017.

Beyond his training in combat search and rescue and personnel recovery operations, Kraines was also a military static-line jumper, a free fall jumper, an Air Force combat scuba diver and certified as an emergency medical technician, according to the Air Force release.

His awards and decorations include an Air Medal with one oak leaf cluster, Aerial Achievement Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal, Air Force Achievement Medal, Air Force Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Meritorious Unit Award, Air Force Longevity Service Award, Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon with Gold Border, Small Arms Expert Ribbon, Air Force BMT Honor Graduate Ribbon, Air Force Training Ribbon and NATO Medal.


Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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