Here Are All The Guns Used In Netflix’s ‘The Punisher’

Entertainment
"The Punisher" screenshot via Netflix

Frank Castle has finally returned to Netflix as The Punisher — and he brought an arsenal with him.


Beyond the titular anti-hero’s proclivity for firearms which dates back to his time in the Marine Corps, Netflix’s The Punisher presents itself as a gun-heavy series from its first moments. The opening credits of the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s latest installment features a dizzying array of assorted small arms that swarm across the screen to form Castle’s leering skull logo, triumphantly announcing a core pillar of the The Punisher: It’s a 13-episode firefight, dished out in one-hour servings.

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This is no surprise, obviously. But even though there’s a staggering amount of gunplay — and knife fights, and brawls, and bombs — it’s the sheer diversity of firearms featured in The Punisher that caught our eye. And fortunately for us, the eagle-eyed gun sleuths over at the Internet Movie Firearms Database (an online repository of all things gun and cinema) have already started cataloging the weapons featured in The Punisher.

Here’s a list of nearly all the firearms featured in The Punisher organized chronologically by when they appear in the show (and yes, there are spoilers ahead):

Accuracy International AWSM-F

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What’s a TV series about a gun-toting vigilante without an American Sniper-style CGI shot? Nothing! Which is probably why the show’s first episode kicks off with Castle taking out a cartel leader in Juarez, Mexico, from the other side of the border in El Paso, Texas, with an Accuracy International AWSM-F rifle.

Boom, headshot.

Smith & Wesson Model 19

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Want to show a bunch of gangsters hanging out at their hideout that you mean business? Just waltz in wearing a ski mask and wave this hand cannon around; they’ll know who’s boss — right up until the moment one of your buddies drops his wallet and gives a room full of hardcore criminals a clear look at his ID. Smooth, bro, real smooth.

Suffice it to say, these inept thieves don’t make it past the first episode — neither does the Smith & Wesson Model 19. Which is a shame, since it’s the only revolver in The Punisher.

Taurus PT92

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The Brazilian-made Taurus PT92 pistol gets a brief moment in the limelight in the hands of an unnamed gangster during the first episode. Like the S&W; Model 19, the Taurus and its owner don’t make it to episode two. Yes, this will become a running trend.

TEC-9

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The TEC-9 submachine gun makes its first appearance among a pile of firearms at an off-the-books poker game for a bunch of nefarious gangsters in the show’s first episode. The next time we see it, it’s on the floor next to its owner, who is dead. Told ya!

M1911A1

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Castle picks up the tried and battle-tested .45-caliber handgun from yet another dead bad guy in episode one and proceeds to mow down his enemies with the workhorse that helped win not one, but two world wars. A few episodes later, in “Kandahar,” Castle is shown carrying the Kimber Warrior, an M1911-style handgun, during a flashback to his time in Afghanistan.

Image via iFunny.co

And on that note…

Glock 17

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The lightweight Glock 17 handgun is known for its reliability and the high-capacity of its standard magazine, but unfortunately for Carson Wolf, a corrupt Department of Homeland Security agent, this pistol doesn’t live up to its reputation in the show. In the second episode, “Two Dead Men,” Wolf is disarmed by Castle, and then shot with his own Glock. Once Wolf finally gets his pistol back, he realizes (too late) that it’s empty. So much for that 17-round mag, huh?

Sig Sauer 516

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Earlier in “Two Dead Men,” DHS security agents armed with Sig Sauer 516s run through a shoot house operated by a private contracting company called Anvil. Though, whether or not it was purely for training purposes, or a chance to sniff out what sorts of illicit activities the CIA-backed contracting firm is involved in, isn’t immediately clear. If the point was good training, though, someone may want to ask Anvil and DHS why their rifles are missing front sights.

Beretta 92FS

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The Beretta 92FS shows up in the hands of Army veteran Lewis Wilson who nearly shoots his father after abruptly waking up from a bad dream in episode three, “Kandahar.” A post-9/11 vet, Wilson and his M9 show up a few more times — as do a number of tired vet stereotypes — throughout the season.

Related: ‘The Punisher’ Is Here And It’s Filled With Guns, Violence, And Veteran Stereotypes »

Heckler & Koch 416 A5

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There are clearly perks to being handpicked for a super-secret CIA hit squad, like ditching MARPAT cammies for MULTICAM and swapping out the standard M4 for a more exotic firearm.

That certainly applies to the HK416 A5, which Castle and his teammates carry in Kandahar, during a flashback sequence in the show’s third episode — though it immediately becomes clear that the American troops don’t have enough ammo for what’s in store…

AKS-74U

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When the mission in Kandahar goes bad, Castle takes on dozens of Taliban fighters, grabbing an AKS-74U (presumably from a fallen fighter) when ammo for his HK416 runs dry. When the AK runs out of rounds, he grabs a rock. This is the battle alluded to in the second season of Daredevil for which Castle was awarded the Navy Cross — and it’s pretty clear why.

Sig Sauer P250 Compact

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The P250 Compact is the deterrent of choice for David Lieberman, aka “Micro,” who gets chewed out by The Punisher when the cyber sleuth makes the mistake of saying the pistol is “just for show” in episode four. To be fair, the handgun spends most of the season hidden under Lieberman’s desk or pointed at perceived threats, so he’s not totally wrong.

Ruger Mini-14

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Also in episode four, some bad intel leads to a botched attempt to steal a cache of weapons; instead of a stockpile of firearms and ammunition, Castle makes off with a hot pink Ruger Mini-14, and no ammo (Seriously, Micro, you had one job!)

Why the hot pick pee-shooter? Apparently it was a sweet 16 present for a mobster’s daughter. No idea why there’s a frag grenade in that crate though.

Heckler & Koch MP5

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When Castle sets out to meet up with a former squadmate from his days on a black ops hit team in episode five, the two are ambushed by a group of Anvil mercs armed with Heckler & Koch MP5s and suppressors. The private contracting goons are also rocking body cameras, so their handler — dubbed “Agent Orange” —  can watch as they’re dispatched, one by one, in high def.

Heckler & Koch MP7

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In episode six, an already-creepy dream involving a family dinner at Lieberman's home takes a horrifying turn when armed and masked men enter the house and kill Castle’s wife and kids (for the second time), along with Lieberman and his family. One of those men is armed with a Heckler & Koch MP7. It’s a pretty gruesome scene, but a grim reminder of the demons that haunt Castle.

Sig Sauer P226

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Sig Sauer’s P226 shows up in the hands of Department of Homeland Security personnel in episode eight, but unfortunately for one agent, Sam Stein, he brought a gun to a wrist-mounted-spring-loaded knife fight. I guess Stein forgot he was facing off with a character from Assassin's Creed.

via GIPHY

Mossberg 500

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In episode eight, when Homeland’s Agent Dinah Madani gets into a shootout with Anvil mercenaries led by Castle’s former brother-in-arms turned merciless war profiteer Billy Russo, she wades into the fray with what looks to be a Mossberg 500 pump-action shotgun. However, given the frenetic gunfight, it’s tough to tell for sure whether it’s a Mossberg 500 or a different variant. Whichever model, it does a pretty good job blasting through scores of bad guys.

Smith & Wesson M&P;

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In episode 10, Castle uses Karen Page as a human shield by pretending to hold her hostage with a Smith & Wesson M&P; during a standoff with New York police. Good thing Page decided to rekindle her friendship with Castle — it’s definitely working out well.

Heckler & Koch G36C

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After decapitating an Anvil contractor, tying a grenade to the severed head, and blowing up a bunch of Anvil goons, Castle dispatches a few more hitmen with a Heckler & Koch G36C in The Punisher’s eleventh episode.

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In the end, though, it’s hard to feel bad for a group of guys who don’t have enough common sense to book it after a skull-clad vigilante tries to kill them with a head-grenade.

M249 SAW

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In the explosive final moments of the main shootout in episode 11, Castle triggers a series of booby traps to kill or maim the remaining gunmen before pulling a M249 Squad Automatic Weapon out of a cardboard box (cleverly hidden beneath packing peanuts) and laying waste to every bad guy, and at least one cement pillar, in sight.

Given the sheer volume of fire and firearms in The Punisher, there’s a good chance we didn’t catch every weapon — so, if we missed something, let us know in the comments.

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