American Legion: Trump Should Spend Money On Vets Instead Of Parade

Code Red News
President Donald Trump watches as a marching band passes the reviewing stand during his inaugural parade on Pennsylvania Ave. outside the White House in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.
Associated Press/Andrew Harnik

The American Legion said in a statement Thursday that money that will be spent on an upcoming military parade "would be better spent fully funding the Department of Veteran Affairs and giving our troops and their families the best care possible."


The statement came following a CNBC report by Amanda Macias, citing a defense official with firsthand knowledge, which estimated the parade would cost $92 million — $80 million more than initially estimated.

The parade, still in the planning stages, is scheduled for November 10, marking both the Veterans Day holiday and the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.

According to the CNBC report, the parade in Washington, D.C. is expected to include approximately eight tanks and other armored vehicles such as Bradley Fighting Vehicles and Strykers, uniformed personnel, and flyovers from helicopters, fighters, transport aircraft, and historical planes.

President Donald Trump ordered the Pentagon to explore the idea of a military parade in Washington after returning from France in July 2017, where he attended a military parade in with French President Emmanuel Macron.

"We're going to have to try to top it," Trump said jokingly to Macron, during a meeting on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly in September.

In the Legion statement, however, National Commander Denise Rohan cautioned that a parade at the current time would be premature since the U.S. still remains engaged in the war on terror (the last time a parade was held in Washington was to celebrate the end of the Gulf War in 1991).

“The American Legion appreciates that our President wants to show in a dramatic fashion our nation’s support for our troops," Rohan said. "However, until such time as we can celebrate victory in the War on Terrorism and bring our military home, we think the parade money would be better spent fully funding the Department of Veteran Affairs and giving our troops and their families the best care possible.”

WATCH NEXT:

An E-2D Hawkeye assigned to the Bluetails of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 121 lands on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Will Hardy)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

While attempting to land on the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln in the Arabian Sea earlier this month, an E-2D Hawkeye propeller aircraft struck two F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft and sent debris flying into two other F/A-18s on the flight deck, according to the Naval Safety Center.

Read More Show Less

Nobody can be told what The Matrix is; you have to see it for yourself.

More than two decades after The Matrix showed the world what the future of the sci-fi action flick could look like, Warner Bros. Pictures plans on producing a fourth installment of the groundbreaking epic saga, Variety first reported on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Sailors from Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 1 conduct category III qualifications on the M2A1 heavy machine gun at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. CRS-1 is qualifying for future mobilization requirements. (U.S. Navy/Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Kenji Shiroma)

The Navy is considering giving Ma Deuce a quiet new update.

Read More Show Less
A competitor performs push-ups during the physical fitness event at the Minnesota Army National Guard Best Warrior Competition on April 4, 2019, at Camp Ripley, Minnesota. (Minnesota National Guard photo by Sgt. Sebastian Nemec)

Despite what you may have heard, the Army has not declared war on mustaches.

The Army W.T.F! Moments Facebook page on Monday posted a memo written by a 3rd Infantry Division company commander telling his soldiers that only the fittest among them will be allowed to sprout facial hair under their warrior nostrils.

"During my tenure at Battle Company, I have noticed a direct correlation between mustaches and a lack of physical fitness," the memo says. "In an effort to increase the physical fitness of Battle Company, mustaches will not be authorized for any soldier earning less than a 300 on the APFT [Army Physical Fitness Test]."

Read More Show Less
Task & Purpose

I don't always drop everything to spend a few hours with a short, squat Marine, but when I do, you can bet it's for Chesty.

Read More Show Less