Indiana Guardsman killed at Fort Hood was 'proud father and husband'

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Staff Sgt. Andrew Michael St. John.

Indiana National Guard

The Indiana National Guard soldier who was killed on Thursday in a training accident at Fort Hood has been identified as 29-year-old Staff Sgt. Andrew Michael St. John, of Greenwood, Indiana.


St. John — "a proud father and husband," according to information released by the Indiana National Guard — served as an infantryman with Company B, 1st Battalion, 151st Infantry Regiment. According to the Indiana Guard, he was at Fort Hood serving as an "embedded observer controller/trainer with Army National Guard Operations Group Wolf."

Lt. Col. Chad Pittman, commander of the 1st Battalion, 151st Infantry Regiment, said in a statement released by the Indiana National Guard that St. John was "respected and admired for his great love for his country and family.

"He continually sought ways to ensure the success of subordinates, better himself as leader, and contribute to the achievements the organization," Pittman said. "My deepest sympathy for his family at this sad and difficult time."

St. John previously deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq; his awards include the Army Commendation Medal, two Army Achievement Medals, the Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal, and more.

The tactical vehicle accident that resulted in St. John's death is still being investigated.

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