The Army's New Camouflage Will Hide Soldiers And Tanks In Plain Sight Wherever They Are

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The U.S. Army is moving forward on next-generation concealment technology to ensure that American soldiers can hide in plain sight.


Fibrotex has built an Ultra-Light Camouflage Netting System that can be used to conceal soldier's positions, vehicles, tanks, and aircraft. The new "camouflage system will mask soldiers, vehicles, and installations from state-of-the-art electro-optical sensors and radars," the company said Thursday in a press release sent to Business Insider.

Fibrotex has been awarded a contract to supply this advanced camouflage to conceal troops from night vision, thermal imaging, radar and more.

Soldiers, vehicles, and other relevant systems can just about disappear in snowy, desert, urban, and woodland environments, according to the camouflage maker.

The new program aims to replace outdated camouflage that protect soldiers in the visible spectrum but not against more advanced, high-end sensors. ULCANS "provides more persistent [infrared], thermal & counter-radar performance," Fibrotex explained.

Ultra-Light Camouflage Netting SystemFibrotex USA

The Army has awarded Fibrotex a 10-year indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract valued at $480 million. Full-scale production will begin next year at a manufacturing facility in McCreary County, Kentucky, where the company expects to create and secure hundreds of new jobs in the coming years.

"Today, more than ever, military forces and opposition groups are using night vision sensors and thermal devices against our troops," Eyal Malleron, the CEO of Fibrotex USA, said in a statement.

"But, by using Fibrotex's camouflage, concealment and deception solutions, we make them undetectable again, allowing them to continue keeping us safe."

The result came from roughly two years of testing at the Army's Natick Soldier Systems Center, where new technology was tested against the Army's most advanced sensors.

Fibrotex noted that the netting is reversible, creating the possibility for two distinctly different prints for varied environments. And while outsiders can't see through the netting, those on the inside have an excellent view of their surroundings, as can be seen in the picture above.

See how the camouflage netting avoids detection:

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