The Army plans on stocking up on a lethal update to the legendary Carl Gustaf bazooka

Bullet Points
The M3 Carl Gustaf

The Army intends to drop some major cash to bolster its arsenal of 84mm Carl Gustaf recoilless rifles over the next three years, according to a new contract.


  • Awarded on Feb. 14, the multi-year agreement with the Swedish Carl Gustaf godfather Saab Dynamics AB authorized a $19 million delivery of the upgraded M3A1 recoilless rifles for delivery as soon as this year to replace the Army's existing M3 systems.
  • That $19 million purchase represents a major boost in funds on top of the service's $23.3 million line item to acquire 300 M3E1 recoilless rifles, itself a four-fold increase over the $6.5 million earmarked for system in the branch's fiscal 2018 budget request.
  • The new M3E1 Carl Gustaf variant represents a streamlined update to the legacy system, its new titanium shell reducing the system's weight by 28% and its length by 2.5 inches, according to the contract.
  • The M3E1 recoilless rifle systems also offers U.S. service members the capability to fire off multiple salvos of different specialized ammunitions, an important departure from the one-and-done low-cost AT-4 anti-tank system.
  • According to Saab, the Marine Corps will also field several M3E1 recoilless rifle systems after adopting the classic M3 system for the first time ever back in August 2018 to replace the branch's existing arsenal MK153 Shoulder-Launched Multipurpose Assault Weapons.

SEE ALSO: The Carl Gustaf Is Getting Yet Another Lethal New Upgrade

WATCH NEXT: Gunner's Underground: The M3E1 Carl Gustaf

Tom Delonge has been speculating about aliens for years. According to Vulture, he quit Blink 182, the band he founded, years ago to "expose the truth about aliens," and he founded To The Stars Academy of Arts and Sciences "to advance society's understanding of scientific phenomena and its technological implications" — or, in simpler terms, to research UFOs and extraterrestrial life.

Read More Show Less

A tentative plan to build 20 miles of extra border wall in Arizona, on top of the already approved 100-plus miles, was put on hold Monday by the Pentagon.

Federal officials hoped to build the extra 20 miles of wall in the Border Patrol's Tucson and Yuma sectors. The Army Corps of Engineers said late last month that funds would come from other wall contracts that might cost less than expected. But those savings did not materialize, according to documents filed Monday in federal court in Washington, D.C.

Read More Show Less

Iran's top diplomat threatened an "all-out war" Thursday with the U.S. or Saudi Arabia if either country launches a retaliatory strike over a drone and missile attack on oil reserves that sent energy prices soaring.

Tehran's tough-talking foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, threw the gauntlet down, promising a battle that would go on "to the last American soldier."

Read More Show Less
Task & Purpose photo illustration by Paul Szoldra

After a pair of Army explosive ordnance disposal technicians were indicted on federal charges for attempting to sell weapons and explosives to smugglers headed to Mexico, one of the two men involved has been sentenced after taking a plea deal, according to court documents filed on Wednesday.

Read More Show Less

JALALABAD, Afghanistan (Reuters) - A U.S. drone strike intended to hit an Islamic State (IS) hideout in Afghanistan killed at least 30 civilians resting after a day's labor in the fields, officials said on Thursday.

The attack on Wednesday night also injured 40 people after accidentally targeting farmers and laborers who had just finished collecting pine nuts at mountainous Wazir Tangi in eastern Nangarhar province, three Afghan officials told Reuters.

"The workers had lit a bonfire and were sitting together when a drone targeted them," tribal elder Malik Rahat Gul told Reuters by telephone from Wazir Tangi.

Read More Show Less