Why Did A New Army Ranger Allegedly Commit A Gruesome Motel Murder-Suicide?

Bullet Points
An undated Department of Labor photo of Krishna Mahadevan-Prasad
Courtesy Renton Police Department

The Army is actively cooperating with law enforcement in Washington state as they continue their investigation into a newly minted Ranger's alleged gruesome murder and mutilation of a woman in a motel outside Seattle in July, just before he fired on two parked vehicles and fatally shot himself, Stars and Stripes reports.


  • Pvt. Krishna Mahadevan-Prasad, a 20-year-old soldier assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, reportedly spent just three minutes on July 24th killing and mutilating a 38-year-old woman in a Renton, Washington, motel room, according to surveillance footage viewed by The Seattle Times.
  • A timeline put together by law enforcement indicates that after exiting the motel room, Mahadevan-Prasad walked through a parking lot before opening fire with a rifle and shotgun on two parked cars waiting at the nearby Hood Canal bridge. He narrowly missed the two drivers and two sleeping children, ages 5 and 6, before shooting himself at the entrance to the bridge.
  • “We are aware of the incident that occurred July 24th, 2018 in the vicinity of Hood Canal Bridge, and are cooperating with the Washington State Patrol who maintain lead in this investigation,” U.S. Army Special Operations Command spokesman Lt. Col. Robert Bockholt told Stars and Stripes on Tuesday.
  • According to local law enforcement, Mahadevan-Prasad had only been at Joint Base Lewis-McChord for two weeks; he'd completed his One Station Unit Training, Basic Airborne Course, and Ranger Assessment and Selection Program 1 at Fort Benning, Georgia, earlier that month after joining the Army in September 2017.

The grisly details of what exactly happened in that motel room are not public, but according to Stripes, investigators suspect that Mahadevan-Prasad "may have committed other acts of violence" in the past based on what detectives found when they arrived on the scene.

WATCH NEXT:

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney takes questions during a news briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 17, 2019. (Reuters/Leah Millis)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump's withholding of $391 million in military aid to Ukraine was linked to his request that the Ukrainians look into a claim — debunked as a conspiracy theory — about the 2016 U.S. election, a senior presidential aide said on Thursday, the first time the White House acknowledged such a connection.

Trump and administration officials had denied for weeks that they had demanded a "quid pro quo" - a Latin phrase meaning a favor for a favor - for delivering the U.S. aid, a key part of a controversy that has triggered an impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives against the Republican president.

But Mick Mulvaney, acting White House chief of staff, acknowledged in a briefing with reporters that the U.S. aid — already approved by Congress — was held up partly over Trump's concerns about a Democratic National Committee (DNC) computer server alleged to be in Ukraine.

"I have news for everybody: Get over it. There is going to be political influence in foreign policy," Mulvaney said.

Read More Show Less

Former Defense Secretary James Mattis decided to take on President Donald Trump's reported assertion that he is "overrated" at the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner in New York City on Thursday.

"I'm not just an overrated general, I am the greatest — the world's most — overrated," Mattis said at the event, which raises money for charity.

"I'm honored to be considered that by Donald Trump because he also called Meryl Streep an overrated actress," Mattis said. "So I guess I'm the Meryl Streep of generals ... and frankly that sounds pretty good to me. And you do have to admit that between me and Meryl, at least we've had some victories."

Read More Show Less

The former Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs thinks that the VA needs to start researching medical marijuana. Not in a bit. Not soon. Right goddamn now.

Read More Show Less

The United States and Turkey have agreed to a temporary cease fire to allow Kurdish fighters to withdraw from a safe zone that Turkey is establishing along its border with Syria, Vice President Mike Pence announced on Thursday.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A Navy doomsday aircraft that would play a vital communication role in the event of a nuclear war had one of its four engines replaced this month after it struck a bird at a Maryland air station.

Read More Show Less