Army Reserve Captain Among Those Killed In Mass Shooting At Orlando Nightclub

news

Editor’s Note: This article by Brendan McGarry originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.


A U.S. Army Reserve officer was among those killed in the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

Antonio Davon Brown, 29, was a captain in the Army Reserve and slain in the attack Sunday at an Orlando nightclub, Cynthia Smith, a spokeswoman at the Defense Department, confirmed in an interview with Military.com.

The Pentagon plans to release more details about Brown's service record on Tuesday, according to Smith.

Brown was a member of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps while a student at Florida A&M; University.

"We are especially saddened by the news that one of the victims was part of the FAMU family," the university said in a statement.

"29-year-old Antonio Davon Brown was a criminal justice major from Cocoa Beach, Florida and a member of ROTC during his time on the Hill. He graduated from FAMU in 2008 and is being remembered fondly by classmates and fellow alumni on social media. We will continue to update you about plans for a memorial or service of remembrance for alumnus Brown," it said.

"In the meantime, the Florida A&M; University community stands with the entire Orlando community in the wake of tragedy," the university said. "Our thoughts, and prayers for peace, are with everyone in central Florida and across this nation."

The gunman was identified as Omar Mir Seddique Mateen, a 29-year-old U.S. citizen and Muslim who lived in Fort Pierce, Florida, and whose parents were of Afghan origin. While he was apparently acting alone, he had pledged allegiance to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS.

The incident was the deadliest mass shooting in American history, with at least 50 individuals confirmed dead, including the gunman, who was killed in a shootout with police, and another 53 injured. Several remain critically injured.

The shooting began around 2 a.m. Sunday morning at a packed Orlando nightclub called Pulse, which caters to the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender, or LBGT, community and lasted until around 5 a.m., when a SWAT team raided the building.

The shooting is also the deadliest terrorist attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001, when al-Qaeda militants crashed airliners into the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon near Washington, D.C., and a field in Pennsylvania, killing nearly 3,000 people.

One Twitter user said she and Brown served in the same ROTC class and that he served tours of duty in both Iraq and Afghanistan.

"I can hardly breathe," she tweeted. "I never thought any one of us from Class of 08 would die young. We all came back from war safely.

"He killed my friend, my battle buddy," she said of the shooter. "CPT Antonio Brown survived Iraq and Afghanistan to die like this."

She went on to describe an incident during her senior year. After she was unsuspectingly dropped from her parents' health insurance, she got sick with the flu and passed out during class. Brown and his roommate carried her to his car and drove her four hours from Tallahassee to Fort Stewart, Georgia, so she could receive treatment from the Army.

"Antonio saved my life when no one else could be bothered to care," she said.

This article originally appeared on Military.com.

More from Military.com:

Photo via Florida A&M University
(DoD/Petty Officer William Selby)

Former Army Gen. David Petraeus, the former commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan who resigned in disgrace as CIA director amid revelations of an extramarital affairs, was passed over by then-president-elect Donald Trump's transition team because of his criticism of torture, according to leaked vetting documents.

Read More Show Less
(YouTube/WTOC Extras)

Lt. Col. Robert Friend was always glad to share his story with schoolkids — and what a story it was.

Friend, one of the last surviving Tuskegee Airmen, died Friday at age 99 at his Long Beach, Calif., home.

Not only did Friend fly 142 missions in the iconic black unit in the Army Air Corps, he went on to serve in the Korean and Vietnam wars.

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON — State-backed Iranian hackers have stepped up cyberattacks on the U.S., according to the Department of Homeland Security's cyberagency.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

A teen who fatally stabbed a Kaneohe Bay Marine during an attack by 15 youths in the early morning hours of Oct. 21, 2017, in Waikiki pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of manslaughter Friday and will serve no more than 20 years in prison.

Read More Show Less
(YouTube/Natasha Mozgovaya)

The bodies of a U.S. Air Force servicewoman and her two small children were found inside their smoke-filled Staten Island home in an apparent triple murder, with her husband taken into custody Saturday while wandering the streets of Brooklyn, police said.

Read More Show Less