Army Sergeant Faces Court-Martial For Allegedly Calling Fellow Soldier Fat, Pointing Gun At Another

Bullet Points
U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Nicolas Z. Erwin

A U.S. Army sergeant faces up to a year imprisonment and a bad paper discharge for, among other things, repeatedly calling one soldier fat and pointing an unloaded sidearm at another, according to a batshit insane Stars & Stripes report.


  • According to prosecutors, Sgt. 1st Class Jessica Barboza allegedly in dereliction of duty after she reportedly pointed a 9mm pistol at another sergeant while participating in marksmanship training near Allied Joint Force Command Naples, telling the sergeant, "stay still so I can find my sight picture."
  • Barboza also allegedly engaged in maltreatment by "repeatedly calling a specialist fat in front of other soldiers," according to Stars & Stripes.
  • In addition, she allegedly "committed disrespect of a noncommissioned officer when she touched the hair of an African-American staff sergeant and made a derogatory comment," according to Stars & Stripes.
  • Barboza was offered nonjudicial punishment and declined, her defense attorney told the publication, because "she did not believe she was going to get a full and fair hearing."

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