Astronaut Buzz Aldrin Will Model For An Underwear Fashion Icon

Humor
Visual representation of what Buzz Aldrin probably looks like as an underwear model.
Photo composite by Brian Adam Jones

Buzz Aldrin, the legendary astronaut who became the second man ever to walk on the Moon, will be strutting his stuff on a different stage: the catwalk.


During New York City Fashion Week this year, 86-year-old Aldrin will be closing out the show for Nick Graham, founder of the underwear company Joe Boxer.

Page Six reported Aldrin said, “I’ve walked on the moon, so how hard can it be to walk in a fashion show?”

Unfortunately, Aldrin won’t be modeling Graham’s iconic smiley-faced underwear.

Graham’s line is supposedly centered on Mars, with galactic-style formal wear. The collection will be called “Life on Mars: Fall-Winter 2035.”

What’s more, Page Six wrote, is that the inimitable Bill Nye is narrating the show.

“I’m a huge fan of both Bill Nye and Buzz Aldrin,” Graham told WWD fashion blog. “Both of them have had an enormous impact on our understanding of science and space. To work with them on the Mars show is so exciting. And besides, Mars is the new black.”

ABC News anchor Tom Llamas just before his network airs grossly inaccurate footage

Video footage of a purported "bombing of Kurd civilians" by Turkish military forces shown on ABC News appeared to be a nighttime firing of tracer rounds at a Kentucky gun range.

Read More Show Less

For U.S. service members who have fought alongside the Kurds, President Donald Trump's decision to approve repositioning U.S. forces in Syria ahead of Turkey's invasion is a naked betrayal of valued allies.

"I am ashamed for the first time in my career," one unnamed special operator told Fox News Jennifer Griffin.

In a Twitter thread that went viral, Griffin wrote the soldier told her the Kurds were continuing to support the United States by guarding tens of thousands of ISIS prisoners even though Turkey had nullified an arrangement under which U.S. and Turkish troops were conducting joint patrols in northeastern Syria to allow the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, to withdraw.

"The Kurds are sticking by us," the soldier told Griffin. "No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us."

Read More Show Less

The U.S. military's seemingly never-ending mission supporting civil authorities along the southwestern border will last at least another year.

On Sept. 3, Defense Secretary Mark Esper approved a request from the Department of Homeland Security to provide a total of up to 5,500 troops along the border until Sept. 30, 2020, Lt. Gen. Laura Richardson, commander of U.S. Army North, said on Monday.

Read More Show Less

Editor's note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

On Aug. 16, two 7-ton trucks collided aboard Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California. Thirty Marines were sent to the hospital.

Read More Show Less

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia announced on Monday it would hold a large test of its Strategic Missile Forces that will see it fire ballistic and cruise missiles from the land, sea and air this week.

The exercise, from Oct. 15-17, will involve around 12,000 military personnel, as well as aircraft, including strategic nuclear bombers, surface ships and submarines, Russia's Ministry of Defense said in a statement.

Read More Show Less