This Badass Tomahawk Will Make You Long For The Zombie Apocalypse

Gear
Photo courtesy Wildfire Studios LLC

If you’re looking for that last key item in your bug-out bag, or if you’ve dreamed of rampaging across a post-apocalyptic wasteland like some steampunk viking, this might be for you.


Photo courtesy Wildfire Studios LLC

The Timahawk is a combination tomahawk, crowbar, and hammer, built for survivalists. That means it’s light, durable, and also badass. It’s named after its creator Tim Ralston, a former airman who rose to prominence as an inventor and survivalist after debuting another invention: an entrenching tool and crowbar hybrid called the Crovel, on the popular reality show “Doomsday Preppers.”

Ralston’s most recent creation is just as useful and packed with as much, if not more testosterone than the Crovel, which in addition to being a tool, doubles as a weapon, just like the Timahawk.

"What I was thinking about was what are the tools you'd need in any situation — urban, rural, bush craft — and this is what you want," said Ralston in an interview Task & Purpose.

Related: A Survival Expert Lays Out What You Need In Your Bug-Out Bag »

Weighing in at just four-pounds, the Timahawk features a six-inch axe blade, a two-inch wide crowbar, and a two-inch adze opposite the blade, which can be used to dig a hole or hollow out wood. Heat-treated and made from 4130 pre-hardened steel with a recycled hard-plastic ergonomic handle, hardened stainless steel bolts, the Timahawk is designed for those who want to cram as much utility as possible into one compact package — it’s just 27-inches in length.

It also boasts ergonomic grips that allow you to swing it like a battleaxe, punch through locks, hinges, or a zombie’s face with the blade by gripping it like a doomsday set of brass knuckles, or pry apart just about anything with a little bit of leverage and manly grunting.

The Timahawk can be had for just $189 from their site. Check out what this thing can do in this YouTube video by Ralston below.

The face of a killer. (Flickr/Veesees)

Editor's Note: This article by Blake Stilwell originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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