Top 5 Oddest Things Found On Military Bases This Month

Humor

An elephant

Serving in the Indian military is an adventure, even if you end up working in the chow hall. Earlier this week, a video surfaced of an elephant wandering through the dining facility, much to the chagrin of the local troops.


A dildo

Ah yes, the British Army. These plucky royals obviously inspired much of the U.S.’s military traditions; in this case, we can see the American Army’s heritage on display as British troops try valiantly with a homemade stick to pluck a strategically placed dildo off of the regimental headquarters of the storied Royal Hussars. The unit took to dealing with the, um, unit directly after being notified that groundskeepers would need 40 days to remove the dildo, as it was not a maintenance priority.

One epically bad haircut

We get it: You’re in a rush. It’s a Sunday and Great Clips is closed because a pipe in the bathroom burst. You head over to the PX barber shop and think it can’t go that badly, right?  

https://www.facebook.com/AirForceForum/posts/1012406415599665

An alligator

To the shock of no one, an alligator was discovered lurking near the Marine Corps Air Station New River barracks in North Carolina, like a dependent that smells BAH and Tricare. The cold-blooded killer had evidently lost its fear of Marines because someone (ahem, totally not that Pfc. from Louisiana) had been feeding it near the barracks.

https://www.facebook.com/mcasnewriver/videos/1968921406472852/

Desert military art

Like unearthed treasure, a recent search of Google satellite imagery near 29 Palms, California, revealed an artistic formation in the desert that you can see from space. The meaning behind the art is unknown, as the artist has chosen to remain anonymous; we can only guess that it is a trenchant critique of the duality of man.

Some unknown soul left their mark near 29 Palms California.

UPDATE:

The dildo mentioned above has been removed from the Regimental HQ.

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