The 20 Best Cities For Veterans To Live In

Transition

Looking for a place to hang that framed DD-214 after leaving the military? No, of course not. Nobody does that. That’d be absurd.


However, if you are looking for a vet friendly place to hang your hat, then your best bet is going to be Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, according to Navy Federal Credit Union’s ranking of the top 20 cities for veterans.

The inaugural “Best Cities After Service” list comes from Navy Fed and Sperling’s BestPlaces, which ranked the top picks based on a variety of vet-specific metrics, from veteran success and wellness, to veterans’ income, unemployment rates, access to Veteran Affairs hospitals, and proximity to military bases.

Factors that contributed to overall quality of life — such as access to airports, median home cost, crime, household income, colleges, and arts and culture — were also taken into account.

Navy Federal Credit Union

Navy Federal Credit Union and Sterling's BestPlaces published a“Best Cities After Service” list Nov. 1, and ranked the top 20 cities for veterans in the U.S.

After Oklahoma City, here are the top cities and metropolitan areas for vets:

  • Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area, in Nebraska and Iowa.
  • Colorado Springs, Colorado.
  • The Washington-Arlington-Alexandria metro area, located in Washington DC, Virginia, Maryland and a small portion of West Virginia.
  • Grand Forks metro area, located in North Dakota and Minnesota.
  • Austin-Round Rock, Texas.
  • San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas.
  • Charlottesville, Virginia.
  • Rapid City, South Dakota.
  • Manhattan, Kansas.
  • Columbia, South Carolina.
  • Honolulu, Hawaii.
  • Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont.
  • Iowa City, Iowa.
  • Portland-South Portland, Maine.
  • Dayton, Ohio.
  • Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire.
  • Dubuque, Iowa.
  • Abilene, Texas.

Oklahoma City, for its part, earned its top spot for performing well on both the vet-centric metrics, and overall quality of life, and scored “particularly well in the categories of high incomes and income growth for veterans, low unemployment among veterans and the number of veteran-owned businesses,” Bert Sperling, the founder of Sperling’s BestPlaces said in a statement.

Based on data from the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, each year, more than 250,000 service members transition out of the military — and naturally, they’re in search of a new place to settle as they transition from post-military life.

“Right now, a number of factors make certain areas of the country ideal for veterans who are moving into civilian life,” Robert Frick, a corporate economist for Navy Federal, said in a statement.

“The key factors are where the economic expansion is still going full throttle, which is creating new job and business opportunities for millions of Americans. Personal success is much easier when the economy around you is healthy, and a healthy economy is also a major factor in a better quality of life. ‘Best Cities After Service’ helps veterans find these pockets of prosperity."

SEE ALSO: How To Get Out Of The Military With A Lot More Paper In Your Wallet Than Just A DD-214

NAVAL BASE SAN DIEGO — Three members of the defense team for Navy SEAL Chief Edward "Eddie" Gallagher were revealed on Wednesday to have close ties to the Trump administration amid reports the president is considering the veteran Navy SEAL for a pardon on Memorial Day.

President Donald Trump's personal attorney, Marc Mukasey, 51, and longtime Trump associate Bernard Kerik, 63, a former New York City police commissioner, have joined Gallagher's defense team in recent months, both men told Task & Purpose on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, in response to a question from a reporter after a motions hearing, lead defense attorney Tim Parlatore confirmed that he had previously represented Pete Hegseth, the conservative Fox News personality who has been privately lobbying Trump since January to pardon Gallagher, according to The Daily Beast.

Read More Show Less
(Associated Press photo)

(Reuters) - John Walker Lindh, the American captured in Afghanistan in 2001 fighting for the Taliban, was released early from federal prison on Thursday, the Washington Post reported, citing Lindh's lawyer.

Lindh, who was 20 years old when he was captured, left prison in Terre Haute, Indiana, on probation after serving 17 years of a 20-year sentence, the newspaper said.

Now 38, Lindh is among dozens of prisoners to be released over the next few years after being captured in Iraq and Afghanistan and convicted of terrorism-related crimes following the attacks on the United States by al Qaeda on Sept. 11, 2001.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brian M. Wilbur.)

Defense officials will brief President Donald Trump's national security team on a plan that involves sending 5,000 more troops to the Middle East to deter Iran, Task & Purpose has learned.

So far, no decisions have been made about whether to send the reinforcements to the region, unnamed U.S. officials told CNN's Barbara Starr.

"The military capabilities being discussed include sending additional ballistic missile defense systems, Tomahawk cruise missiles on submarines, and surface ships with land attack capabilities for striking at a long range," CNN reports. "Specific weapons systems and units have not been identified."

Read More Show Less

Dashcam footage from a freeway commuter shows the moment a pilot ejected from an F-16 military jet last week, releasing a parachute before the aircraft slammed into a Riverside County, California warehouse.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Marine Corps/Staff Sgt. Oscar L Olive IV)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Several members of the Marine Corps' famous Silent Drill Platoon were kicked out of the service or punished by their command after someone reported witnessing them using a training rifle to strike someone.

Three Marines have been discharged in the last 60 days and two others lost a rank after the Naval Criminal Investigative Service began looking into hazing allegations inside the revered unit that performs at public events around the world.

Read More Show Less