The Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert L. Wilkie on Nov. 11, 2018. (DoD/Lisa Ferdinando)

Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie is reportedly pushing an "internal campaign" to be the next secretary of defense, the Washington Post reported.

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In this Sept. 26, 2013 file photo, Joseph Hunter, second from left, a former U.S. Army sniper who became a private mercenary, is in the custody of Thai police commandos after being arrested in Bangkok, Thailand. (Associated Press/Sakchai Lalit)

A former Army sergeant who worked as a sniper instructor and carved out a post-military career as a mercenary under the moniker 'Rambo' was sentenced to life in prison for his role in the contract killing of a woman in the Philippines, the Department of Justice announced on Thursday.

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Chelsea Manning (U.S. Army photo)

Former Army intelligence analyst turned whistleblower Chelsea Manning has been ordered jailed until she testifies before a grand jury as part of an investigation into Wikileaks, a federal judge ruled on Friday.

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President Donald Trump speaks about American missile defense doctrine, Thursday, Jan 17, 2019, at the Pentagon. (Associated Press/Evan Vucci)

The White House is drafting a proposal that would demand allied countries not just foot the bill for U.S. service members deployed within their borders, but an additional 50% "for the privilege of hosting them," Bloomberg News reports.

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USMA cadet Peter L. Zhu. Photo: AP

After the death of their 21-year-old son, the parents of West Point cadet Peter Zhu were permitted to retrieve his sperm in hopes that "a small piece of Peter...might live on," the Army Times reports.

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Marines and sailors with Marine Expeditionary Brigade – Afghanistan load onto a KC-130 aircraft on the Camp Bastion flightline, Oct. 27, 2014. U.S. Marine Corps photo

Like Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong, U.S. officials have a five-year plan — for ending America's longest war, that is.

  • The New York Times reports that a new U.S. government plan would see the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan in the next three to five years, with half of the 14,000 American service members currently deployed there headed home "in coming months."
  • The plan would also see the 8,600 European and Australian forces take over the train, advise, and assist mission that's been a cornerstone of the NATO presence there for the last, with U.S. military personnel increasingly focused on "counterterrorism strikes" against militant targets, according to the Times.
  • The Times' account of the withdrawal plan, described as "offered in peace negotiations with the Taliban," is based on details shared with reported "by more than a half dozen current and former American and European officials."
  • But Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Koné Faulkner flatly denied the report a statement to Task & Purpose: "As peace talks with the Taliban continue, DoD is considering all options of force numbers and disposition, but no decisions have been made at this time."

Task & Purpose Pentagon correspondent Jeff Schogol contributed reporting

SEE ALSO: The US Has Worked Out A 'Draft Framework' With The Taliban To End The War In Afghanistan

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