When A Car Overturned On The Road, These Veterans Intervened

news
A screenshot from an NBC News report shows Military veterans Lavell Zachary and Chad Collard as they comfort two children after a car crash on May 20 in Trotwood, Ohio.

On May 20 two military veterans, Chad Collard and Lavell Zachary, rushed to help the victims of a car crash, including two adults and three young children, ages 3, 4, and 8 in Trotwood, Ohio.


According to WDTN, an NBC news affiliate, Collard and Zachary were both strangers before that moment, but when they saw an overturned SUV on the road, the two men responded the same way — they ran to help.

"I was scared of a fire happening or whatever and wanted to make sure everyone was okay," said Collard, who saw the vehicle while driving the opposite direction and hopped across the overpass to help.

According to Zachary, his intervention wasn’t a matter of choice, but of instinct.

"You heard screams of kids. How could you ride by that?" Zachary said in a Fox News interview.

Related: Marine Vet Who Took Down Armed Robber Says He Followed His Instincts »

The two men pulled the children out of the back of the vehicle, where police said they were not properly secured. The two youngest children clung to their rescuers.

“The little boy, he never knew me and he was gripping me as tight as he could,” Zachary told WDTN.

The two men helped the kids from the vehicle and comforted them while they waited for the paramedics to arrive.

"The little girl walked to me and I pulled her out the back and latched on to me the whole time," Collard said.

Witnesses of the crash told police that the female driver and male passenger were seen hitting each other before the incident.

According to Fox News, the police said they think the alleged dispute may have played a role in the crash.

The children were taken to Dayton Children’s Hospital in Ohio and are all in good condition. Both the man and woman injured in the crash are reported to have non-life threatening injuries.

WREX.com – Rockford’s News Leader

Pearl Harbor survivor Lauren Bruner attends the dual interment of fellow USS Arizona survivors John D. Anderson, boatswain's mate 2nd class, and Clarendon R. Hetrick, seaman 1st class, at the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as part of the 75th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy/Petty Officer 2nd Class Somers Steelman)

Just before 8 a.m. on a Sunday morning 78 years ago, Lauren Bruner was preparing for church services and a date that would follow with a girl he'd met outside his Navy base.

The 21-year-old sailor was stationed as a fire controlman aboard the U.S. battleship USS Arizona, overseeing the vessel's .50-caliber guns.

Then alarms rang out. A Japanese plane had bombed the ship in a surprise attack.

It took only nine minutes for the Arizona to sink after the first bomb hit. Bruner was struck by gunfire while trying to flee the inferno that consumed the ship, the second-to-last man to escape the explosion that killed 1,177, including his best friend; 335 survived.

More than 70% of Bruner's body was burned. He was hospitalized for weeks.

Now, nearly eight decades after that fateful day, Bruner's ashes will be delivered to the sea that cradled his fallen comrades, stored in an urn inside the battleship's wreckage.

Read More Show Less
Joshua Kaleb Watson (Facebook via Business Insider)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Joshua Kaleb Watson has been identified as one of the victims of a shooting at the Naval Air Station Pensacola, CBS News reported.

The 23-year-old Alabama native and Naval Academy graduate was named to the Academy's prestigious Commandant's and Dean's lists, and also competed on the rifle team, Alabama's WTVY reported.

Read More Show Less
Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani (Courtesy photo)

PENSACOLA, Fla. (Reuters) - The Saudi airman accused of killing three people at a U.S. Navy base in Florida appeared to have posted criticism of U.S. wars and quoted slain al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden on social media hours before the shooting spree, according to a group that monitors online extremism.

Federal investigators have not disclosed any motive behind the attack, which unfolded at dawn on Friday when the Saudi national is said to have began firing a handgun inside a classroom at the Naval Air Station Pensacola.

Read More Show Less
Saudi air force Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed al-Shamrani (NBC News)

The Saudi military officer who shot and killed 3 people at Naval Air Station Pensacola on Friday reportedly hosted a "dinner party" the week before the attack "to watch videos of mass shootings," the Associated Press reports, citing an unnamed U.S. official.

Read More Show Less
Soldiers from the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) hold folded flags before military funeral honors. (U.S. Army/Elizabeth Fraser)

The Minnesota National Guard has released the names of the three soldiers killed in Thursday's helicopter crash.

Read More Show Less