Fallen Soldier's Downrange Comrades Reveal His Baby’s Gender In Touching Video

Community
Courtesy Britt Harris

On Aug. 2, Spc. Chris Harris died in Afghanistan, one of two soldiers from Fort Bragg’s 82nd Airborne killed when an IED struck their convoy near Kandahar. Harris’ wife, Britt, was pregnant with their first child.


Two months later, on Oct. 5, Harris’ brother soldiers, still deployed downrange, posted a video welcome to a “new member of the company” — a video you might not expect from a crew of battle-tested Airborne grunts. It was a touching gender-reveal party in Afghanistan for the Harrises’ baby, ahead of its birth:

It’s a girl. And the men of the 82nd’s 2nd Battalion, 504th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team couldn’t be happier.

Pfc. Joel Crunk of Mississippi served with Harris and posted the video to his YouTube account. "August 2 2017 Chris Harris laid down his life for our country. His newly wed wife was expecting their first child," Crunk wrote in the video’s description. "The reveal is in Afghanistan with the men who fought by his side. We are happy to welcome the new member of our company."

The heartwarming video, replete with pink confetti-poppers, brought tears to Britt Harris’ eyes, she told ABC News. “I probably watched it 100 times myself,” she said. “I was crying but smiling because their reaction was so wonderful.”

But she wasn’t completely surprised: She’d let the soldiers in on the baby’s gender, after all.

"Chris is an only child. They were his family," she told ABC. "Everyone that I’ve met, before Chris passed and after, if they’re in the military, they’ve treated me like actual family or royalty, actually."

It was only natural, then, when she asked Harris’ comrades “to be the first to know the gender and they were really excited,” she said. “I told them I would ship confetti poppers or something and they could be the first to know and feel included.”

It was the least they could do for family. "Chris was an amazing guy and a great soldier," Crunk told a hometown TV station. "He sacrificed his life on the altar of freedom. I'm honored to share his story."

Meanwhile, Britt has another tribute to her fallen husband planned.

Christopher Michael Harris’ daughter, she says, will be named Christian Michelle Harris, after him. Just as soon as she gets around to being born.

Riley Howell

Riley Howell, the Army ROTC cadet shot and killed while restraining an active shooter at UNC Charlotte on April 30, was posthumously awarded the ROTC Medal of Heroism earlier this month for his heroic sacrifice, the Army announced.

Read More Show Less
The scene of Monday's plane crash in North Carolina. (North Carolina Department of Transportation/Susan Kinner)

A military plane crashed in North Carolina on Monday, according to the Marine Corps.

The pilot safely ejected before the crash in Craven County, and no deaths have been reported, according to a Facebook post from the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing.

Read More Show Less

A U.S. Army National Guardsman convicted of murder in the 2010 fatal shooting of an Afghan man was released Monday morning from a military prison at Fort Leavenworth.

As a white van carried Sgt. Derrick Miller to a parking lot at the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks, the guardsman's mother, Renee Myers, held an American flag and excitedly said: "Ah, my baby."

"Hey, mom," Miller said as he stepped out of the van after eight years in military prison. He rubbed her back as the two embraced.

Miller's release comes as President Donald Trump is said to be considering pardons for several military members accused or convicted of war crimes, The New York Times reported Saturday.

Read More Show Less
The Hays Country Sheriff's Department in Texas (YouTube screenshot)

Five U.S. Navy sailors have been charged with aggravated sexual assault in connection with a rape reported in Hays County, Texas last year.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Marine Corps Veterans salute during the 5th Marines Vietnam War Memorial unveiling ceremony in the Camp San Mateo Memorial Garden at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., May 28, 2018. (U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Rhita Daniel)

California's high cost of living makes it a difficult place for retired military service members to settle down, according to an annual report by financial services website WalletHub.

California — home to the largest number of active-duty troops in the nation — fares poorly in the survey when it comes to affordable housing, homelessness and the proportion of of businesses in the state that are owned by veterans.

Read More Show Less