Colorado hotel employees fired for displaying sign disparaging military at post-deployment event

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(Facebook/Justin Vames)

Two employees of a Colorado Springs hotel have been fired after making a sign critical of military personnel and displaying the sign at a military ball, hotel officials said.


The incident happened March 14 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Colorado Springs, according to the hotel's general manager, Daniel Kammerer.

Kammerer was apologetic about the sign, which said: "No longer serving military personnel & their guest(s)."

The sign was created and displayed by two supervisors of the hotel and displayed at a post-deployment event, with more than 600 people, who were honoring and celebrating military service and sacrifice, as reported Friday by CBS 4.


"Our property has a proud history of hiring veterans and welcoming the military as our guests," Kammerer said in a Facebook post the day after the incident. "Last night two of our team members acted without the proper authority to close and exclude military guests from our hotel's bar. This action is inconsistent with our values, and we humbly apologize."

Kammerer, who has a brother who serves in Navy, went on to say that the two employees have been fired and that their actions are not representative of the hotel and its staff.

"We deeply regret any offense to the service members and their guests and have implemented a retraining of our employees to ensure this does not happen again," Kammerer said. "We are honored and proud to support our military community and their families and look forward to continuing to serve those who serve us."

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©2019 The Denver Post. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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