The Air Force veteran who helps others bring their whole selves to work at Comcast

Sponsored Content

Kelly Bronson

(Courtesy photo)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Comcast committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace. Comcast is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn More.

Kelly Bronson has a fulfilling job: He spends his days seeking the best and most varied talent and bringing them to Comcast. To do this, he leans on the lessons gained in his 27-year career with the Air Force and his passion for diversity and inclusion.

Growing up in Dayton, Ohio, Bronson wanted to do something meaningful with his life. He also sought a change of scenery, so he enlisted in the Air Force after high school. "I worked as a personnel specialist," Bronson said. "I was in charge of everything a human resources generalist would do in the civilian world." He loved this time of his life; he traveled, served his country, and had unique experiences.

After 10 years of service, Bronson separated from the Air Force in order to further his education. He earned his MBA while working in the corporate world, yet still felt that something was lacking. "I missed serving in the military," he said. "I missed the camaraderie." In 2002, Bronson joined the Air Force Reserve as a logistics readiness officer. "Being able to work full time in the corporate world and serve part time in the military was a perfect balance," he said.

While working in university relations, Bronson was recruited to join Comcast. "After speaking to multiple people and leaders at Comcast about the role, the culture, and the military benefits, it was a no-brainer for me," he said. "I had to be part of it." He joined Comcast in December 2017 as the director of University Relations and Military Hiring. Bronson's passion for working in outreach is apparent. "I absolutely fell in love with the job," he said.

Working at Comcast and maintaining his Air Force Reserve status has required a lot of balance. "I have to plan ahead for both sides, and occasionally collisions do occur," Bronson explained. "But my work at Comcast is totally different from my work in the Air Force. Between the two, I get to flex both sides of my brain." One commonality he has found is his role as a leader. "In both jobs, it is my duty to motivate my team, provide a sense of direction, and offer support so that they can stand on my shoulders and reach for the stars."

Comcast, a global media and technology company headquartered in Philadelphia, is known for the value it places on diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Bronson finds its principles inspiring. "No one has to hide their service connection, no one has to hide their sexuality, no one is challenged on their belief system," he said. "Everyone is encouraged to bring their whole self to work each day — and that's amazing."

Comcast is a veteran-friendly corporation. "Service matters to us," Bronson said. "We are breaking the norm that many companies follow of placing veterans in specific roles." Comcast finds the best entry point for every veteran. "Veteran employees can be vice presidents, service directors, frontline workers, and so much more at Comcast," said Bronson. "Across the organization, we are seeking the best place for our military talent."

Comcast hosts on-base events to help foster openness and understanding between the military and the company. It also regularly hosts coffee chats, held at Comcast headquarters, to build connections and attract military talent.

VetNet, a company-wide employee resource group with more than 700 members, is one of the ways that Comcast supports its veteran employees, encouraging them to connect with other members of the military community and their allies for networking, camaraderie, and support.

Working to recruit the best and most diverse talent to Comcast has taught Bronson a few important lessons. "When veterans are starting a post-military career, it is very important that they be patient with themselves and with their potential employers," he explained. It takes time to translate military experience into civilian experience. Bronson urges veterans to not rush this process.

"Veterans must change the way they speak about their military service," he added. "They must talk without military jargon, because many recruiters don't understand milspeak."

Veteran jobseekers must also adapt how they explain their service so that it is relevant and understandable in the civilian world. "When applying for a job, it is important to focus on the minimum job requirements and ensure you can meet them all," Bronson said. "If you can't address the job qualifications quickly and concisely on your resume, you will be overlooked." When a veteran applicant adequately addresses these lessons, 1 in 4 gets passed to the hiring manager with Comcast where applicants really shine when they can demonstrate how the leadership, teamwork, and decision-making skills they honed in the military will apply to their business.

In his time at Comcast, Bronson has used his experience and passion to help grow and change the face of the company. Whether it's exercising leadership skills gained in the Air Force or collaborating with his team to further diversification, Bronson is committed to supporting an open and inclusive company that allows everyone to be their true self.

This post sponsored by Comcast

U.S. Airmen from the 22nd Airlift Squadron practice evasive procedures in a C-5M Super Galaxy over Idaho Dec. 9, 2019. The flight included simulated surface-to-air threats that tested their evasion capabilities. (Air Force photo/Senior Airman Amy Younger)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — As many as 380 Americans on the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Japan – which has nearly 300 passengers who have tested positive for the deadly coronavirus, now known as COVID-19 – will be extracted Sunday from Yokohama and flown to Travis Air Force Base near Fairfield and a Texas base for further quarantine.

Read More

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

After whiffing on its recruiting goal in 2018, the Army has been trying new approaches to bring in the soldiers it needs to reach its goal of 500,000 in active-duty service by the end of the 2020s.

The 6,500-soldier shortfall the service reported in September 2018 was its first recruiting miss since 2005 and came despite it putting $200 million into bonuses and issuing extra waivers for health issues or bad conduct.

Within a few months of that disappointment, the Army announced it was seeking soldiers for an esports team that would, it said, "build awareness of skills that can be used as professional soldiers and use [its] gaming knowledge to be more relatable to youth."

Read More

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A New Mexico Army National Guard soldier from Mountainair, who served as a police officer and volunteer firefighter in the town, died Thursday from a non-combat related incident while deployed in Africa, according to the Department of Defense.

A news release states Pfc. Walter Lewark, 26, died at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti where he was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in the Horn of Africa.

Read More

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon is requesting about as much money for overseas operations in the coming fiscal year as in this one, but there is at least one noteworthy new twist: the first-ever Space Force request for war funds.

Officials say the $77 million request is needed by Oct. 1 not for space warfare but to enable military personnel to keep operating and protecting key satellites.

Read More

NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. prosecutors on Thursday accused Huawei of stealing trade secrets and helping Iran track protesters in its latest indictment against the Chinese company, escalating the U.S. battle with the world's largest telecommunications equipment maker.

In the indictment, which supersedes one unsealed last year in federal court in Brooklyn, New York, Huawei Technologies Co was charged with conspiring to steal trade secrets from six U.S. technology companies and to violate a racketeering law typically used to combat organized crime.

Read More