The Dallas Shooting Suspect Had Military Experience

news
Photo via Facebook

On July 7, just before 9 p.m., shots rang out in downtown Dallas, Texas, during a protest over recent police shootings in Minnesota and Louisiana. Initial reports suggested that multiple gunmen were involved, and that the attack had been organized as an ambush, with the shooters taking aim at police officers from an elevated position. So far, five officers have been confirmed dead, including one who had served three tours in Iraq with the Navy. Seven more officers and two civilians were also wounded in the attack. It was the deadliest day for American law enforcement since Sept. 11, 2001.


After a prolonged standoff in a hotel near the scene of the shooting, Dallas police used a robot armed with a bomb to kill one of the suspected gunman, who, according to the Los Angeles Times, has been identified as Micah X. Johnson, a 25-year-old U.S. Army veteran. Before he was killed, the suspect told law enforcement officials that he was upset “with white people.” Additionally, Johnson claimed he was “not affiliated with any groups,” that he carried out the attack alone, and that he had planted bombs “all over” downtown Dallas, the city’s police chief, David Brown, said during a press conference.

“The suspect said we will eventually find the IEDs,” Brown said. “He wanted to kill officers. And he expressed killing white people, killing white officers, he expressed anger for Black Lives Matter.” He added: “None of that makes sense. None of that is a reason to do harm to anyone.”

Police are not yet convinced that Johnson was the only gunmen involved in the shooting. The police chief said other suspects were in custody, but did not specify how many. “I’m not going to be satisfied until we turn over every stone,” Brown said. “So if there is someone out there that was associated with this, we will find you and we will prosecute you and we will bring you to justice.”

A photo of Micah X. Johnson taken from Facebook shows him in uniform.Photo via Facebook.

So far, few details about Johnson or his military service have been made public. According to the Los Angeles Times, he lived in the Dallas area, and his immediate family lives in Mesquite Texas, east of Dallas. Following his death, Johnson’s sister posted photos of her brother on Facebook, showing the slain suspect in his military uniform. From the photos it is difficult to deduce what unit Johnson served in or any other specifics about his military service aside from the fact that he was, at least at one point, an enlisted soldier. However, a U.S. defense official told The Daily Beast that Johnson served as a corporal in the Army Reserve as part of the 284th Engineering Company, and that he deployed to Afghanistan.

According to the U.S. Army, the 284th Engineering Company is based in Seagoville, Texas, right outside of Dallas. The unit was activated for a deployment to Herat Province, Afghanistan in September 2013 and was reverted to reserve status in October 2014. A reporter at the Washington Post tweeted that Johnson was a Carpentry and Masonry Specialist (MOS 12W), and that he was still in the Individual Ready Reserves at the time of his death. Construction appears to have been the 284th's primary mission in Afghanistan. Dan Lamothe, another Washington Post reporter, has tweeted that, per Johnson's Army records, he was not a recipient of the Combat Action Badge, which is awarded to soldiers who've engaged in direct combat with the enemy.

Suspected gunman Micah X JohnsonPhoto via Facebook

Correction: An earlier version of this article stated that Micah X. Johnson was not a recipient of the Combat Action Ribbon. "Combat Action Ribbon" has been changed to "Combat Action Badge," which is awarded to soldiers who've engaged in direct combat with the enemy. The Combat Action Ribbon is not an Army award. (7/8/16; 8:57pm)
Casperassets.rbl.ms

Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

Take $75 off a Casper Mattress and $150 off a Wave Mattress with code TASKANDPURPOSE

And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

Read More Show Less
A Coalition convoy stops to test fire their M2 machine guns and MK19 Grenade Launcher in the Middle Euphrates River Valley in the Deir ez-Zor province, Syria, Nov. 22, 2018 (U.S. Army/Sgt. Matthew Crane)

BEIRUT (Reuters) - A suicide bomber drove his car into a checkpoint in northeastern Syria on Monday, injuring several soldiers of Kurdish-led forces during a joint convoy with U.S. allies, locals said.

Read More Show Less

Video game company Blizzard Entertainment, which creates blockbuster franchises like World of Warcraft and Overwatch, has stood behind veteran employment for years. On top of hiring veterans, they support many related programs, including Activision Blizzard's Call of Duty Endowment. Blizzard's goal there is to help veterans find careers by supporting organizations that prepare veterans for the job market.

Read More Show Less
A combat patrol advanced three miles north of Lucca (furthermost point occupied by American troops) to contact an enemy machine gun nest in September 1944 as part of the Italian Campaign (DoD/National Archives and Records Administration)

World War II Army veteran Milton Miller says he has never forgotten an act of cowardice by his platoon leader.

It happened in the Alban Hills south of Rome following the Allied Forces' amphibious invasion on the Italian beaches of Anzio in January 1944.

Read More Show Less

The Israeli military followed up on its weekend strikes in Syria the same way that any modern military might: By taunting its regional foe Iran with a silly-ass tweet.

Read More Show Less