Disabled Vets Can Now Fly Space-A. Here's What You Need To Know

Bullet Points

As of this year, military veterans with a service-connected disability of 100 percent will be able to fly Space-A on military aircraft, Military.com recently reported.


  • Under the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act veterans with a service-connected disability rating of 100 percent from the Department of Veterans Affairs will be able to hop on any scheduled or unscheduled military flight operated by Air Mobility Command within the continental United States — though direct flights are available to Alaska, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa according to Military.com.
  • For those interested in traveling this way, keep in mind: You'll be in the lowest priority group — Category 6 — along with retirees and their dependents.
  • However, dependents of vets with a total disability rating won't be eligible to use this service, according to Military.com.
  • Because Space-A travel is literally based on "space available," hence the name, it's generally a good idea only if you have a flexible schedule, and some cash for room and board during your travels in case you have to wait a bit.
  • Fortunately the service is pretty cheap, with participants typically paying only a small tax or inspection fee.
  • As Task & Purpose's Jared Keller previously reported, the Disabled Veterans Access to Space-A Travel Act was introduced back in 2016, before it was merged with the fiscal 2019 NDAA that President Donald Trump signed into law in August.

SEE ALSO: Disabled Veterans Picked Up A Major Travel Benefit In The Latest Defense Bill

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