Donors In Homeless Vet, New Jersey Couple's GoFundMe Scam Will Get Their Money Back

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Mark D’Amico, his girlfriend, Kate McClure, and homeless veteran Johnny Bobbitt will reportedly faced charges that include conspiracy and theft by deception.
Associated Press/Elizabeth Robertson/The Philadelphia Inquirer

Thousands of people who opened up their wallets for a homeless man in a GoFundMe scam too good to be true got their money back just in time for Christmas.


GoFundMe confirmed Monday that 14,000 donors will be getting their money back from the scam, which raised more than $400,000.

“All donors who contributed to this GoFundMe campaign have been fully refunded. GoFundMe always fully protects donors, which is why we have a comprehensive refund policy in place,” spokesman Bobby Whithorne told the Daily News.

“While this type of behavior by an individual is extremely rare, it's unacceptable and clearly it has consequences. Committing fraud, whether it takes place on or offline is against the law. We are fully cooperating and assisting law enforcement officials to recover every dollar withdrawn by Ms. McClure and Mr. D'Amico.”

GoFundMe typically keeps 2.9% of each donation, as well as 30 cents for each transaction, according to the company website, but the full donation will be refunded, Whithorne said.

Prosecutors say Johnny Bobbitt, a homeless veteran from Philadelphia, schemed with Katelyn McClure and her ex-boyfriend, Mark D'Amico, to create a story about how he gave his last $20 to buy gas for McClure, who was stranded at a gas station.

After sharing their story on GoFundMe, the threesome raised more than $400,000, which they allegedly spent on trips and luxury items.

McClure claims she was set up by Bobbitt and D’Amico, but their lawyers said she was in on the grift.

All three were arrested and charged with theft by deception and conspiracy to commit theft by deception.

They could face up to 10 years in jail if convicted.

SEE ALSO: The Saga Of That Homeless Vet’s $400,000 GoFundMe May Have Been One Giant Hoax

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©2018 New York Daily News. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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