Eglin AFB curtails running portion of PT test following captain's death

news
Capt. Tranay Lashawn Tanner. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Physical fitness tests were briefly suspended earlier this week and outdoor cardio testing will be curtailed for the remainder of the summer at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, after an airman died Aug. 17. She had completed her PT test on Aug. 16.


Capt. Tranay Lashawn Tanner, 29, was transported to the Eglin Hospital at 8:30 a.m. Aug. 16 with health complications, according to a base news release. Tanner, assigned to the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center (AFOTEC), Detachment 2, was later moved to the Fort Walton Medical Center due to the "serious nature of her condition." She died at 1:30 a.m. Aug. 17.

"We suspended fitness testing operations on Monday for a brief period of time, less than one day," Ilka Cole, a base spokeswoman, said Thursday.

Cole said normal fitness testing operations have resumed, with a slight variation: The 9 a.m. testing schedule will no longer include outdoor cardio -- the run or walk. That portion will be left off the test until Oct. 1. The run/walk will still be done during the 5 a.m. and 7 a.m. time slots, she said.

Testing for the indoor components — the waist measurement, push-ups and sit-ups — will remain the same, Cole said.

Tanner's cause of death has not been determined. "That investigation is ongoing," Cole said.

"I am deeply saddened over Tranay's death," said Lt. Col. Timothy Stevens, AFOTEC commander, in the release. "The pain of her absence has touched each and every one of us. Our thoughts and prayers are with Tranay's family, her friends and our fellow airmen during this difficult time."

In June, Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, suspended fitness tests in the wake of two airmen's deaths.

Col. Derek O'Malley, commander of Shaw's 20th Fighter Wing, ordered the PT test stand-down and an investigation into any potential connections between the deaths of Senior Airman Amalia Joseph, 32, and Senior Airman Aaron Hall, 30. Both died a few days after suffering health complications during the run portion of the test.

Joseph died May 26 and Hall on June 1. Both airmen were assigned to the 20th Component Maintenance Squadron, Shaw officials said in a statement.

Officials resumed the test at Shaw weeks later. Investigations into their deaths have not yet been released.

This article originally appeared on Military.com

UPDATE: This story was updated on Aug. 26 to clarify when Tanner was hospitalized and died.

More articles from Military.com:

Chief Master Sgt. Jason Morehouse. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The command chief of the 20th Fighter Wing at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, was removed from his position last month after his chain of command received evidence he disrespected his subordinates.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

The "suck it up and drive on" mentality permeated our years in the U.S. military and often led us to delay getting both physical and mental health care. As veterans, we now understand that engaging in effective care enables us not just to survive but to thrive. Crucially, the path to mental wellness, like any serious journey, isn't accomplished in a day — and just because you need additional or recurring mental health care doesn't mean your initial treatment failed.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Free Liberty.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg has called on the security alliance's allies to maintain and strengthen their "unity," saying the organization is "the only guarantor of European and transatlantic security."

Stoltenberg told reporters on November 19 that NATO "has only grown stronger over the last 70 years" despite "differences" among the allies on issues such as trade, climate, the Iran nuclear deal, and the situation in northeastern Syria.

He was speaking at the alliance's headquarters in Brussels on the eve of a NATO foreign ministers meeting aimed at finalizing preparations for next month's summit in London.

Read More Show Less
An aerial view of the Pentagon building in Washington, June 15, 2005. (Reuters/Jason Reed JIR/CN)

WASHINGTON — More than $35 million of the roughly $400 million in aid to Ukraine that President Donald Trump delayed, sparking the impeachment inquiry, has not been released to the country, according to a Pentagon spending document obtained by the Los Angeles Times.

Instead, the defense funding for Ukraine remains in U.S. accounts, according to the document. It's not clear why the money hasn't been released, and members of Congress are demanding answers.

Read More Show Less
Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

The admiral in charge of Navy special operators will decide whether to revoke the tridents for Eddie Gallagher and other SEALs involved in the Navy's failed attempt to prosecute Gallagher for murder, a defense official said Tuesday.

The New York Times' David Philipps first reported on Tuesday that the Navy could revoke the SEAL tridents for Gallagher as well as his former platoon commander Lt. Jacob Portier and two other SEALs: Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch and Lt. Thomas MacNeil.

The four SEALs will soon receive a letter that they have to appear before a board that will consider whether their tridents should be revoked, a defense official told Task & Purpose on condition of anonymity.

Read More Show Less