Member Of Jelly Bean Empire Faces Lawsuit For Killing Man With WWII-Era Tank

news
Photo composite via Wikimedia Commons

In August 2015, Dwayne Brasher ran over a man named Kevin Wright with a World War II-era M5 tank. Now Wright’s family is seeking justice for what they are calling a wrongful death. The kicker? Dwayne Brasher is married to Jelly Belly jelly bean CEO Lisa Brasher, and the tank belonged to her father — candy mogul Herman Rowland Sr.


The lawsuit was filed May 11 in California Superior Court. It accuses the Jelly Belly family of negligence resulting in wrongful death and goes on to say that the incident orphaned Wright’s two daughters, and stripped his 80-year-old father of a provider.

Rowland collects and restores old military vehicles, which he keeps in his personal showroom in Fairfield, California. It is known as the “Tank Barn.”

Wright was originally hired by the family to help maintain the vehicle collection. At Rowland’s request, he went along for a tank ride with Brasher, who was not trained to operate the M5.

During the ride, Wright was thrown from the tank, and Brasher ran over him.

“Defendants had a duty to train and supervise the persons operating the M5 tank and to lend their World War II vehicles only to individuals with sufficient knowledge to drive them so as to ensure they would be operated safely,” the suit claims.

Brasher and Rowland have yet to respond to press inquiries about the suit.

The Pentagon is no longer topless. On Tuesday, the Senate voted to confirm Mark Esper as the United States' first permanent defense secretary in more than seven months.

Esper is expected to be sworn in as defense secretary later on Tuesday, Pentagon spokesman Jonathan Hoffman told reporters.

"We are grateful for the Senate leadership and the Senate Armed Services Committee's willingness to quickly move through this process," Hoffman said.

Read More Show Less
(Paramount Pictures via YouTube)

The new trailer for Top Gun: Maverick that dropped last week was indisputably the white-knuckle thrill ride of the summer, a blur of aerial acrobatics and beach volleyball that made us wonder how we ever lost that lovin' feeling in the decades since we first met Pete "Maverick" Mitchell back in 1986.

But it also made us wonder something else: Why is Maverick still flying combat missions in an F/A-18 Super Hornet as a 57-year-old captain after more than 30 years of service?

Read More Show Less
(Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

KABUL (Reuters) - Afghanistan called on Tuesday for an explanation of comments by U.S. President Donald Trump in which he said he could win the Afghan war in just 10 days by wiping out Afghanistan but did not want to kill 10 million people.

Read More Show Less
(KCNA via Reuters)

SEOUL/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspected a large, newly built submarine, state news agency KCNA reported on Tuesday, potentially signaling continued development of a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) program.

Kim inspected the operational and tactical data and combat weapon systems of the submarine that was built under "his special attention", and will be operational in the waters off the east coast, KCNA said.

It said the submarine's operational deployment was near.

"The operational capacity of a submarine is an important component in national defense of our country bounded on its east and west by sea," Kim said.

Read More Show Less

It starts with four letters, maybe even just three.

When Don and Diane Shipley find out someone claims to be a Navy SEAL or POW, they won't just take their word for it. And when it comes to liars, they take no prisoners.

The couple has made it their mission to track down and expose "phonies" — their word for people who falsely claim to be Navy SEALs and/or former prisoners of war.

Read More Show Less