The Insanely Useful Firestarter That Fits On Your Keychain

Gear

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There are a lot of “Emergency Firestarters” on the market. How many of them would actually do you good in an emergency situation is probably quite a small fraction of those. Most are frankly not very well thought out, or they are difficult to use when you are cold and/or wet. Not so with the NANOspark by Exotac.

The Exotac NANOspark is a great little fire starter. If you want to go the bushcraft route, you can make your nice little birds nest and throw sparks into it. Baby it along and get a fire going. On the other hand, if you NEED to start a fire, the Nanospark will do it.

The Nanospark by ExotacIvan Loomis/KitBadger

The NANOspark is machined out of aluminum and has a small waterproof container, making up the body of the unit. Inside, it comes with a compact piece of tinder which can easily be fluffed up to catch a spark. This is invaluable in an emergency. The tinder is easy to light and incredibly forgiving if your fire making skills aren’t on point.

The Nanospark by ExotacIvan Loomis/KitBadger

There are some other great features built in as well, which is why the NANOspark has become a fixture on my keychain and part of my EDC. A turnkey solution to starting a fire.

You can pick up the NANOspark here and check out other firestarters from Exotac here.

This review originally appeared on Kit Badger

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