Ohio Air National Guard F-16 makes emergency landing following weapon jam during training exercise

news
Four U.S. Air Force F-16C Fighting Falcons from the Ohio Air National Guard's 180th Fighter Wing fly in formation during air refueling training in Swedish airspace, Feb. 8, 2018. (U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Luke Milano)

An F-16 fighter jet with the 180th Fighter Wing performed an emergency landing Tuesday morning at Toledo Express Airport after an onboard weapon jammed during training.


Staff Sgt. Shane Hughes, spokesman for the Ohio Air National Guard base at the airport, said F-16s were conducting routine training in Michigan when one experienced what's known as a "hung gun." He said a 20-millimeter cannon jammed, and standard procedure requires an emergency landing.

"They returned to base to have that checked out," Sergeant Hughes said.

Kayla Lewandowski, a Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority spokesman, said the landing occurred at 11 a.m.

"The aircraft landed safely and without incident, and taxied to the Air National Guard base under its own power," she said.

The sergeant said there were no flight-related issues and both the pilot and aircraft are safe. He said in-flight emergencies can range from catastrophic engine failure to the equivalent of a check-engine light, all requiring emergency landings.

"They're not uncommon," Sergeant Hughes said. "They happen pretty routinely."

In a news release Tuesday, Ohio Air National Guard officials said the 180th Fighter Wing is conducting increased daytime and nighttime training sessions this week.

People who live near the military group's base could see or hear F-16s taking off and landing at various times. They also might notice increased traffic in the area and unfamiliar noises like sirens, messages from loudspeakers, and "loud booms," the statement said.

"Readiness training, conducted in realistic environments under realistic circumstances, ensures our forces maintain the highest levels of proficiency and readiness for worldwide deployment," Senior Master Sgt. Beth Holliker said in the release.

———

©2019 The Blade (Toledo, Ohio). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

SEE ALSO: An F-16 Fighting Falcon Fought A Hawk And Won

WATCH NEXT: That Time An Air Force Colonel Took An F-16 For A Booty Call

Oops (Twitter)

There's something very, very wrong with a recent tweet from the official Twitter account of the Defense Department. Can you spot it?

Let's zoom in, just in case.

Read More Show Less

Two U.S. troops were killed in Afghanistan on Wednesday in a helicopter crash, military officials have announced.

Read More Show Less
The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, June 17, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo)

Two years after a pair of deadly collisions involving Navy ships killed 17 sailors and caused hundreds of millions of dollars of damage, the Navy still can't figure out whether its plan to improve ship-driving training has been effective.

In fact, according to senior Navy officials quoted in a recent Government Accountability Office report on Navy ship-driving, it could take nearly 16 years or more to know if the planned changes will actually have an impact.

Read More Show Less
Chief Master Sgt. Jason Morehouse. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The command chief of the 20th Fighter Wing at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, was removed from his position last month after his chain of command received evidence he disrespected his subordinates.

Read More Show Less
Roxanne Roellchen interacts with her sons in their family's new home, which they moved into after experiencing roaches, leaks and black mold at another property, at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas U.S. November 16, 2019. (Reuters/Callaghan O'Hare)

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (Reuters) - A U.K. company that provides housing to U.S. military families came under official investigation earlier this year, after Reuters disclosed it had faked maintenance records to pocket performance bonuses at an Oklahoma Air Force base.

At the time, Balfour Beatty Communities said it strove to correctly report its maintenance work. It blamed any problems on a sole former employee at the Oklahoma base.

Now, Reuters has found that Balfour Beatty employees systematically doctored records in a similar scheme at a Texas base.

Read More Show Less