Ohio Air National Guard F-16 makes emergency landing following weapon jam during training exercise

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An F-16 fighter jet with the 180th Fighter Wing performed an emergency landing Tuesday morning at Toledo Express Airport after an onboard weapon jammed during training.


Staff Sgt. Shane Hughes, spokesman for the Ohio Air National Guard base at the airport, said F-16s were conducting routine training in Michigan when one experienced what's known as a "hung gun." He said a 20-millimeter cannon jammed, and standard procedure requires an emergency landing.

"They returned to base to have that checked out," Sergeant Hughes said.

Kayla Lewandowski, a Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority spokesman, said the landing occurred at 11 a.m.

"The aircraft landed safely and without incident, and taxied to the Air National Guard base under its own power," she said.

The sergeant said there were no flight-related issues and both the pilot and aircraft are safe. He said in-flight emergencies can range from catastrophic engine failure to the equivalent of a check-engine light, all requiring emergency landings.

"They're not uncommon," Sergeant Hughes said. "They happen pretty routinely."

In a news release Tuesday, Ohio Air National Guard officials said the 180th Fighter Wing is conducting increased daytime and nighttime training sessions this week.

People who live near the military group's base could see or hear F-16s taking off and landing at various times. They also might notice increased traffic in the area and unfamiliar noises like sirens, messages from loudspeakers, and "loud booms," the statement said.

"Readiness training, conducted in realistic environments under realistic circumstances, ensures our forces maintain the highest levels of proficiency and readiness for worldwide deployment," Senior Master Sgt. Beth Holliker said in the release.

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©2019 The Blade (Toledo, Ohio). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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