Florida ex-Marine charged with killing his parents and 2 family dogs

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Jacob Daniel Price (Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office)

An ex-Marine faces premeditated murder charges after admitting to killing his parents and the two family dogs, according to the Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office.


Deputies say Jacob Daniel Price, 30, wore a bloody shirt when he walked into the Crestview Police Department just after 4 a.m. Wednesday to confess. Price also is charged with two counts of aggravated animal cruelty.

The bodies of 51-year-old Jolene Price and 56-year-old Robert Price were discovered with gunshot wounds to the head in the home's master bedroom, according to the arrest report.

One of the deceased dogs was found in the bed with Price's parents while the other was on the floor of the room. Their breed was unclear.

Two unharmed German Shepherds were found at the scene.

Marine Corps spokeswoman Yvonne Carlock told Northwest Florida Daily News that Price, who served from 2009-2013, was deployed twice during Operation Enduring Freedom.

Carlock also said he left the Marines a private because "the character of his service was incongruent with Marine Corps' expectations and standards."

Price's motivation is still unknown, investigators say.

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©2019 Miami Herald. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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