The 5 Best Hype Videos From Fort Bragg's All American Week Kickoff

Mandatory Fun

Monday, May 21, marks the start of All American Week at Fort Bragg, a celebration of all things Americana leading up to Memorial Day weekend.


To kick things off, the 82nd Airborne put out the sweet hype video above to get us amped up for some formation running. It features all the enticing adventures Fort Bragg has to offer, while somehow leaving out the high-interest rate car dealerships and government subsidized tattoo parlors.

The 82nd Airborne in just 82 seconds

Intrepid Fayetteville Observer military editor Drew Brooks managed to shoot this amazing time-lapse of the entire 82nd Airborne as they marched past him —  in just 82 seconds.

The Fort Bragg helo march

The second social video to rock your world features a pile of attack helicopters who are getting ready to be extras in a Michael Bay movie.



Chinook is off the hook

This next one has a Chinook doing a sweet pass in slow-motion. We forgive the fact that the video is shot in portrait mode because it looks amazing.

Not War of the Worlds

Watching this video of helicopters zooming across an American landscape harkens to the Army to respond to an alien invasion. Why aliens are invading Fayetteville, North Carolina, I do not know, but the 82nd Airborne is there to save the day.

Virtual reality marching

Ah, formation running: all the fun of running but with peer pressure and matching shirts. And now in 360° VR, apparently!

Your new motivation for the week

Army Command Sergeant Major John Troxell makes it clear that you shouldn’t be fat, fatty.

Bonus: the peanut gallery

Those five videos encapsulate All American Week, but Fort Bragg is more than just the 82nd. Here's a shout-out to those that are glad they're not dealing with piles of marching, formations, and all the fun that comes with extra details.

All things considered this seems to be a great start to a week of fun, mandatory festivities.  But it makes us all wonder, is the 82nd Airborne still relevant in the age of radar-guided anti-aircraft guns? I don’t know, but I do know that the GoPro footage of a pile of 11Bs hopping out of planes sure looks cool.

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